Seven Remarkable Things About Twitter

By Mark Evans - Monday, March 25th, 2013 at 6:30 am  

It’s hard to believe Twitter recently turned seven.

In the social media landscape, seven years is an eternity. In far less time, social media services can emerge, be enthusiastically embraced and then fade from view – Friendster, MySpace, anyone?

In keeping with the theme, here are seven remarkable things about Twitter.

1. It still hasn’t been acquired or had a company buy a large equity stake. You’d figure by this time, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, etc. would have snapped up Twitter.

2. It hasn’t done an IPO. The timing may not be right now but there would be more than enough interest and demand to do a successful IPO.

3. Twitter doesn’t have any direct competitors. This is not to say there aren’t other companies offering similar services but the last quasi-legitimate rival was probably Pownce, which had more features but never got much traction.

4. Twitter has yet to develop a robust business model that makes its oodles of revenue. Yes, it’s making money from advertising and access to its data but Twitter is far from being a money-making machine.

5. It hasn’t gone mainstream a la Facebook. When you think about it, Twitter is still a niche service, albeit a large niche. Maybe it’s the nature of being a short-form communications medium, or perhaps it’s too geeky to go mainstream.

6. Twitter is still waging war against developers, who had played a key role in building new services to expand Twitter’s features and functionality.

7. Twitter.com is still a no-frills place even though there’s still many ways it could improve by embracing some low-hanging fruit.

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3 Responses to “Seven Remarkable Things About Twitter”

  1. Danny Brown says:

    I think Identi.ca might have something to say re. the “no direct competition” quote… ;-)

  2. Mark Evans says:

    It would be good to see Twitter have a large competitor that would keep it honest. Thanks for the comment.

  3. Danny Brown says:

    Perhaps it needs a smaller one like Identi.ca to remain fluid and not be hampered by the stakeholder demands a larger company would want? There may also be the opportunity for one of the Asian networks to break through – if that happened, I think Twitter would have some serious rethinking to do (even the smaller Identi.ca does some stuff better than Twitter).

    So, first to “go” – Twitter, Facebook, G+, LinkedIn?

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