Archive for the ‘Samples’ Category

Customize Your Dashboard To Deliver The Most Value

Last week we were ecstatic to show the world the brand new Sysomos Heartbeat. We updated the look and feel of Heartbeat, but also added a whole bunch of new and exciting features to help you use it better.

One of the best features that we added to the new Sysomos Heartbeat was the ability for every user to create their very own dashboard. That means that every user can see the information that they need to know most at a quick glance as soon as they enter Heartbeat and they can configure that information in any way they see as a best fit for them.

But what setup would be best for you?

Only you really know the answer. Only you would know what information from the world of social is most important to you and what you need to always have ready to go. But thanks to the new Sysomos Heartbeat dashboards you can try different setups and keep modifying them until you have something that you absolutely love and can’t live without.

Today, we wanted to show you a few examples to get you thinking about how you could arrange your own dashboards inside the new Sysomos Heartbeat.

Executive Overview Dashboard

Now, every company is going to have their own goals they’re trying to achieve in social media and your dashboard should reflect those goals, but we’re going to pretend for this example that the executives at our company want to be able to quickly peak in and see what’s happening around our brand on social media. They want to be able to quickly see what people are saying about us so that they can be connected to the consumers voice. So, in this example dashboard below we’ve set it up to do just that.

The dashboard starts by showing our executives what the conversation levels around our brand have been like over the past 7 days.  Below that we’ve included a share of voice chart so they can see how we’re doing compared to some of our competitors in terms of conversation levels. We then start moving into overviews of what people are saying us by showing our executives what hashtags are being used most in conversations about us and word cloud of the terms around our brand. We then give them a large and interactive buzzgraph so they can see how people are connecting to our brand in their conversations. We follow that up with a snapshot of where in the world people are talking about us and what the sentiment around our brand is. Finally, we have the latest mentions coming in to Heartbeat around our brand so they can see what people are talking about right at the time they are looking at this dashboard.

A setup like this would allow any executive at our company to take a quick look and see what the world is saying about our brand at any time. They may not have the time to manually go through all of the social channels that you’re active in to figure this out, but this dashboard allows them to get that information super quickly and whenever they’d like.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Executive Overview Sample Dashboard

 

The World At A Glance 

In this next example dashboard we’re a world-wide brand and we need to know all the time what key markets think about our brand. For us, it’s important to keep an eye on how much conversation is coming out of these key markets and to make sure that we’re still in favor with the people that live there.

We started this dashboard by showing a heat map of where conversations around our brand are coming from. Underneath we’ve broken down the languages that people are using when they talk about our brand to help us understand how we should be talking to these people. In the next section we’ve broken out how many mentions are coming from some of our key markets so we can keep a close eye on what the conversation levels are like in those markets. Under each market’s mention level we’ve placed a sentiment  chart so that we can also have a snapshot of how our brand is perceived in each of those key markets.

A dashboard like this will allow us to get a quick glimpse at how we’re performing in countries that are important to our company, and if we ever want to know more about any of those markets we can click on the dashboard widget and be taken to the Monitor section of Heartbeat with the filters for that region already set up so we can further explore what’s going on there.

Sysomos Heartbeat - World-Wide Brand Sample Dashboard

 

Demographic Research

In this last dashboard example we want to do some demographic research to find out who’s talking about our brand so that we can make sure that we’re aiming our efforts to better speak to those people most interested in our brand.

In the first line of this dashboard we have a few widgets that show us how much people are talking about our brand and what some of the key things driving that conversation are. Next, we’ve set up widgets that tell us more about our audience like age groups, gender breakdown, what languages they’re using to talk about us and what countries are talking the most about us. We rounded out this dashboard by looking at who the most authoritative sources are that are talking about us and what hashtags people are using most when they mention us, so we can be sure to be part of that conversation.

A dashboard such as this will allow a brand to keep a close eye on who we should be targeting our marketing messages at most and give us an idea of what they’re interested in when it comes to our brand.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Demographic Research Sample Dashboard

These are just a couple of quick example dashboards that we’ve put together to get you thinking about all the ways that you can customize your own Sysomos Heartbeat dashboards. If you have some great ideas on how to set up a dashboard, let us know in the comments or even send us a screen shot of your dashboard. We’d love to know how you’re using the all new Sysomos Heartbeat.

Not using Sysomos Heartbeat yet? Contact us and we’ll be happy to help you get your very own customized dashboard and a whole lot more.

Finding The True Impact Of A Tweet Using Tweet Life

Last week Derek Thompson, a writer for The Atlantic, wrote an article in which he questioned the real value of a tweet. In his article The Unbearable Lightness Of Tweeting, Thompson expressed disappointment because a tweet he was sure was going to get a lot of attention, both on Twitter and with click throughs to the actual article, didn’t draw the engagement he anticipated.

As a journalist Thompson wanted to spread the word about his story and generate traffic to The Atlantic’s website. However, a little less than a week later, in his own words, here’s what he found:

“By Friday morning, it had about 155,260 impressions. According to the new Tweet activity dashboard, 2.9 percent of those users clicked the image, and 1.1 percent retweeted or favored it… but just 1 percent clicked on the link to actually read my story. One percent.”

At first glance, Mr. Thompson is right – a 1% engagement rate is rather low. But, 1,553 clicks isn’t that bad, but it might seem that way when there was the chance for over 155,000 clicks. But does it really mean that there’s no real value to a tweet?

It turns out – you just need to look at the bigger picture. You see, Thompson was using Twitter’s analytics tool and while it’s fantastic at showing a reporting snapshot, a reporting suite such as Sysomos MAP tells a more complete story.

We weren’t the only people that contemplated this question. Our friends over at SKDKnickerbocker thought that there is also a lot more value to a tweet and decided to investigate further into Thompson’s tweet. In the blog post where they did this, they start by pointing out that, “Twitter is a social media platform and the most valuable takeaway, in our view, is the way the message is shared beyond Derek’s 27.8k followers.”

SKDKnickerbocker pulled up Thompson’s tweet to explore its real value using Sysomos MAP‘s Tweet Life function. Tweet Life was able to show that this particular tweet actually seemed to perform quite well. They used Tweet Life to follow the chain of the tweet, meaning how many followers of followers retweeted Thompson’s tweet. In this case the chain went to a level of 10. Looking at this graphic to illustrate the chain, the tweet actually traveled quite far from Thompson’s initial following.

Tweet Life Chain - Created by SKDKnickerbocker

In a report that we did back in 2010 we looked at 1.2 billion tweets and found that the average tweet gets the majority of it’s retweets within the first hour before dying off. Tweet Life can also show you the full life of a tweet. Many studies have shown that tweets barely live on past 10 minutes. In the case of Thompson’s tweet, its half-life was at 10 hours and 13 minutes. That means that his tweet was still going strong over 10 hours later and wasn’t finished yet. The 80% life of this tweet came 2 days and 6 hours after it was tweeted out. This, my friends, is a tweet with legs and a half-life that extended well beyond most twitter activity.

Tweet Life Half-Life - Created by SKDKnickerbocker

There’s many reasons that could explain why Thompson’s tweet didn’t get as many click-throughs to The Atlantic as he had hoped. Perhaps people didn’t find the topic as interesting as he did. It could also be, as Bianca Prade from SKDKnickerbocker told us on the phone, that “sometimes people go to a social network to get their news on the platform that they’re on,” meaning that they could have got enough interesting information for themselves from Thompson’s tweet alone.

Twitter’s analytics dashboard can give you some interesting information about your tweets. But it also only shows you part of the story. This is why many brands and agencies turn to using Sysomos. With tools such as Tweet Life and many others in our software you can get a more complete picture of how well your Twitter and other social media efforts are performing.

If you want a more complete story of how your social is performing, contact us. We’d be more than happy to help you see the full picture.

What Drove Twitter During The Oscars; A Sysomos Report

The Oscars 2015Last week we made a prediction on which film we thought was going to win the Best Picture category at The Oscars over the weekend. We were wrong.

However, if we looked only at Twitter data, we probably would have been right, because Birdman had run away with the conversation on Twitter.

As they say, hindsight is always 20/20. So with clear eyes we’ve created a Sysomos Report looking back at how the evening at The Oscars played out on Twitter.

The first interesting thing that we found was that this year’s Oscars only 8.48 million mentions across social media, which was 39% less than the 2014 Oscars. 99.5% of all of those mentions came from Twitter, which is why we examined Twitter heavily for this report.

Aside from just analyzing the overall theme of The Oscars, we’ve dug deeper into three categories that stood out to our team during the awards. The first is how people were talking about the host. This year’s show was hosted by Neil Patrick Harris and while a lot of people liked him, people seemed to have liked Ellen DeGeneres, who hosted last year, even more. When we compared the two years together we found that NPH was only mentioned in one Oscars related tweet to every 10 that Ellen was mentioned in the previous year. We also looked into who people were tweeting that they’d like to see host next year.

Second, we looked at which of the acceptance speeches was tweeted about the most. Here we found that Patricia Arquette’s acceptance speech for her Best Supporting Actress win in which she spoke about equality for women. This stirred up a lot of talk from the Twitter world, some good and some bad, but was by far the most tweeted about speech.

Lastly, we looked at the #AskHerMore hashtag, which was being used to imply that women have a lot more to talk about than just who they’re wearing as they walk down the red carpet and that reporters covering it should care more. While this hashtag was actually started in 2014, our report finds that 59% of the total times the hashtag has been tweeted was done on Sunday night.

Take a look at the full Sysomos report below:

Who Social Media Thinks Will Take Home Best Picture This Weekend

The 87th Academy AwardsThis Sunday evening millions of people around the world will tune in to watch the 87th Annual Academy Awards, more commonly known as The Oscars.

Movies are a big part of a lot of people’s lives. They love to see good movies, but then they also love to discuss them. And we’ve seen a lot of discussion about this year’s Best Picture nominations happening in social media.

So, we decided to use MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see if we could predict which film is going to win Best Picture this Sunday based on social media chatter over the past year. Here’s what we found:

While all 8 of the nominated films were discussed quite a bit through social media, Birdman was by far the one that came up the most in social media. In fact, when we look at the share of voice pie chart below we see that Birdman owned a full quarter of the conversation around all 8 movies. American Sniper was a close second and owned 21% of the conversation, while Selma came in third with 20%. Of all 8 movies, The Theory of Everything was talked about the least through social channels, but that doesn’t necessarily make it a worse movie.

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Share of Voice

What’s interesting is that when we broke down the mentions of these movies by networks we found that Selma was actually the most talked about movie through blogs, forums and online news outlets. However, Twitter produced the most chatter around all of these movies and on Twitter Birdman was mentioned the most, which drove it to the top spot overall. Boyhood was a close second in mentions in both blogs and online news (only coming in less than 200 mentions behind Selma on news sites), but was fourth in Twitter mentions.  As well, American Sniper was talked about a lot through Twitter and forums, but not nearly as much in blogs and news.

Sysomos MAP - Comparison by Source

We also looked at mentions of these films in terms of when they were mentioned over the past year. It’s interesting here to note that Birdman seemed to have been generating conversations over the entire year despite the fact that it didn’t get a full theatrical release until the late summer of 2014. Most of the other films that were nominated in this category had releases towards the end of the year, so we didn’t see large spikes in conversations about them until around December and then again in January when the Golden Globes happened.

Sysomos MAP - Compare Popularity Chart

Lastly, we looked at the sentiment around each of the 8 nominations. While each movie was talked about positively, The Grand Budapest hotel had the most positive talk around it with 71%. The next closest film in terms of positive mentions was Boyhood with 52% of it’s mentions being scored positively and Selma coming in third with 48% positive mentions.

Sysomos MAP - Comparison of Sentment

While all of the movies nominated for Best Picture were great in their own right, there can be only one winner of the Oscar. Looking at this data above it’s still hard to tell which one the social world liked the best, but we’re going to make our prediction for a winner to be Selma. Selma was talked about the most across most social media channels and also had a great positive sentiment score.

Which film do you think is going to take home the Oscar this Sunday? And is your choice based on the data above or just your own instinct to pick a great film. Let us know in the comments.

We’ll be back next week with a full report about how the Oscars plays out in social media, so come back to check that out.

Sysomos Reports: A Twitter Breakdown of The 2015 Grammys

The GrammysSunday night was one of the biggest nights for music of the year, the 57th Annual Grammy Awards.

The Grammys are always a big event as people tune in to watch their favourite artists perform, see if their favourite artists win awards for their music and, of course, to see what all the celebrities are wearing as they walk down the red carpet.

As like every award show these days, people also love to tweet along as they watch everything play out live on TV. This year, tweets around the Grammys surpassed 10.8 million. That’s a 28% increase in tweets compared to the 2014 Grammys.

Our Sysomos Reports team saw all this action and took a deeper dive into those more than 10.8 million tweets to see what all the action was about. We found that tweets seemed to fall mostly into three categories, which our team then explored in depth; overall Grammy tweets, tweets about nominated artists and tweets about who was the best and worst dressed at the awards. We then put together a report to share our findings around each of these categories to share with you.

In the Sysomos Report below you’ll find information like:

  • Re-tweets accounted for 64% of Twitter content, while 33% were regular tweets and 3% were replies
  • Online activity peaked at 11 PM, when Sam Smith won the Record of the Year award
  • The live performances during the award show generated over 326K mentions and were the most popular theme of the night as well as the key driver of positive conversations (33% of the overall positive content)
  • Winners of the award categories we examined were generally the most tweeted about predictions, except for the album of the year category (which apparently Kanye West didn’t agree with either)
  • People thought that Taylor Swift was the best dressed of the evening while they also thought that Madonna was the worst dressed

Take a look at the full Sysomos Report below:

A Social Media Wrap-Up of Super Bowl XLIX

Super Bowl XLIXThe big game has ended and the world knows that the New England Patriots are now the official Super Bowl XLIX champions (which we actually predicted this would happen last week).

Millions of people around the globe tuned in on Sunday night to watch the very exciting game (and some did for the commercials and the half-time show). But not only were people tuning in on their TV’s, they were also tuning in though social media to see what others were saying about the event and chime in themselves. The Super Bowl has become one of the largest events that people collectively talk through social media about (especially in North America).

Our fantastic Sysomos Reports team was also tuned into the Super Bowl action on social media and recorded everything that they were seeing. The result is a great report on the social media activity that you can view below.

For this report, our team focused on the events of the game and the half-time show, but left out the commercials (which have already been wrapped up many times over across the web).

Some of the highlights you can find in our report include:

  • Super Bowl XLIX, the halftime show and the two competing teams generated a total of 16.7 million tweets on February 1
  • This is about 8% lower compared to the number of tweets accumulated during the Super Bowl XLVIII on February 2, 2014
  • 56% of all tweets this year were retweeted posts, while 41% were original user tweets
  • The social battle between the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks ended with a close win for the Patriots by 14,000 tweets; The quarterbacks’ share of voice was split in 82% for Tom Brady and 18% for Russell Wilson
  • Focusing on two of the more notable issues this year, the brawl that occurred during the last moments of the game (43,574 tweets) was a more dominant topic compared to mentions about the #deflategate issue (32,545 tweets)
  • Sentiment of tweets about the Super Bowl this year was generally favorable, with 58% of all posts (excluding neutral content) being positive
  • Mentions about the Halftime Show were close to 3 million tweets; Katy Perry appeared in 39% of all halftime mentions, compared to 2% for Lenny Kravitz and 8% for Missy Elliott
  • In comparison, Bruno Mars and his SBXLVIII Halftime Show surfaced in 580,700 tweets on February 2, 2014
  • Viewers’ sentiment about the Halftime Show was quite favorable, with 55% of conversations being positive

Take a look at the full report below and let us know what you think stands out the most to you in the comments:

The #NBABallot Campaign Is Seeing Great Numbers From Engaged Fans

#NBABallotIt wasn’t too long ago when to vote your favourite player into an All-Star Game for any sport you had to go to a game and try to poke out those little holes in a ballot card. But gone are those days.

As social media becomes more prevalent throughout almost everything we do, sport leagues have taken it as an opportunity to keep all of their fans involved, regardless of if they physically attend a game or not.

The NBA is currently doing this by inviting fans to vote for their favourite players to appear in the All-Star Game this year via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

The NBA is asking fans to post on one of these social networks with the hashtag “#NBABallot” along with the player they want to vote in. The NBA is then monitoring these channels and adding the results to their website voting and text message votes. They’re also allowing you to vote once a day, so some

And basketball fans around the world seem to be loving it.

As of right now, there’s still six days left for people to cast their votes. However, the NBA is already seeing a great response to this campaign. We used MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see just how well this campaign has been doing so far.

Starting from December 10th up until yesterday (voting started on the 11th), we found the #NBABallot hashtag used across 1.8 million tweets.  That means that people have been voting for their favourite players at an average speed of 2,210 an hour over the past 33 days. Those are some pretty engaged fans.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

What’s more is that it’s not only engaging people in the United States. The United States only accounts for 57.3% of all the votes cast so far. Votes are coming in from around the world. A look at our heat map of where tweets are originating from shows that people around the world are interested in the NBA and are casting their votes.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Over on Instagram the hype is quite large as well. A search for the #NBABallot hashtag on Instagram shows us that it’s been used their 207,670 times.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

In a great move by the NBA and all of the teams around the league, we can see some examples above of pictures to help go with fans votes to make it as easy as possible to cast a vote on the network. All a fan needs to do if they don’t have a picture of their favourite player is download a pre-made picture, which are designed to grab attention and encourage more people to vote and use the hashtag, and upload it to their own account.

Unfortunately, due to Facebook’s privacy settings we couldn’t get a great amount of data behind how many people are posting the #NBABallot hashtag, but if Twitter and Instagram are any indication, we think it’s safe to assume that they’re seeing large numbers as well. You may even have some basketball friend’s of your own who are making posts like these:

Facebook Voting for #NBABallot 1

 

Adding the social voting component to the All-Star Game voting process a few years ago was a great move by the NBA. They realized that their fan base extended past the people that could come into the arena and punch the little holes. It even extended past the United States. By giving fans around the world a chance to participate in this event and making it easy as possible for them, the NBA is solidifying their global audience.

And for those of you wondering which players are being voted for the most, only the NBA knows for sure as they are the only ones with access to all of the numbers. However, according to their last count on January 8, Lebron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers and Steph Curry of the Golden State Warriors are leading the league in total votes respectively in first and second place. We thought it would be interesting to see how they faired against each other on Twitter. So we searched for mentions of their names along side the #NBABallot hashtag and found that Twitter mimics the NBA’s count with James leading the way 105,727 tweets, but Curry isn’t far behind with 89,132 tweets of his own.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Comparison

 

Giving Tuesday Gets Bigger In 2014

Giving TuesdayOn Tuesday we took a look at some of the social numbers behind the people talking about Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year. But there’s one other important day that has come in to play to help kick off the holiday season in the past few years; Giving Tuesday.

Last year, we wrote about Giving Tuesday on the Marketwired blog, which was only in it’s second year of existence. While 2013 was just the second year that Giving Tuesday existed, it was only the first year we had heard about it. The idea of Giving Tuesday was born from the idea that after Americans have spent a weekend on buying things for themselves and loved ones on Black Friday through Cyber Monday, there should be a day where people can help others, which is also in line with the holiday spirit of giving.

Since last year was only the second year of Giving Tuesday’s existence, we looked at how much spread the idea had got through social media. Well, now that Giving Tuesday has had it’s third year of doing good for others, we thought it would be interesting to use MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see how it grew in 2014.

In 2013, “Giving Tuesday” or the hashtag “#GivingTuesday” appeared in about 472,000 social conversations across blogs, online news, forums and tweets. This year we saw the number of mentions rise by over 100,000. This year we found Giving Tuesday being talked about in 1,218 blog posts, 7,649 online news articles, 259 forum postings and 570,016 tweets on just December 2nd. Interestingly, most of that jump of 100,000 mentions happened on Twitter as the other three channels we looked at actually dropped.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Since Twitter was the main driver of conversation this year, we dug a little bit deeper into what happened there. As it turns out, the number of tweets about Giving Tuesday jumped from about 19,000 mentions an hour last year to almost 24,000 mentions an hour this year. Also interesting was that we found who was tweeting about it also changed. Last year women tweeted more about Giving Tuesday than men at 52% to 48%. This year that gap widened though. In 2014 even more women were talking about Giving Tuesday and the gap grew to 54% vs 46%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

Last year we also found that 74.7% of the Giving Tuesday tweets came from the United States. This year, that number grew to 75.3% of all the tweets. But just because the United States seems to be the most involved in Giving Tuesday doesn’t make them the only ones. When we pulled up our geo-location heat map of where tweets were originating from we can actually see that people from around the world were tweeting and taking part in Giving Tuesday.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Last year we also looked at how popular the #GivingTuesday hashtag was on Instagram. Last year we found 17,630 pictures tagged with the hashtag. This year though, that number rose to 70,708… which is a fantastic rise for a great event.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

The best rise in activity that we found this year though was through the sentiment around Giving Tuesday in social channels. Last year 40% of the conversation was positive, while 13% was negative. However, this year, positive sentiment around Giving Tuesday rose to 57% and negative sentiment shrunk to 2%.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

We were really happy to see that Giving Tuesday has seen a rise in awareness in the social sphere. We hope that it goes up even more for next year.

We’re curious to know how charities saw a rise on Giving Tuesday though. If you work for or with a charity, please leave us a comment and let us know what you saw happen on Giving Tuesday and how it changed from last year.

Black Friday by the Social Numbers

Black Friday SaleNumbers vary on depending on where you look, but a lot of people seem to think that Black Friday this year didn’t generate the sales numbers that retailers were looking for. In fact, a lot of outlets are claiming that Black Friday sales numbers this year went down when compared to last year.

But sales numbers aside, Black Friday was still event that people were talking about. And a lot of that talk and sharing of sales and deals was happening though social media.

We decided to take a quick look to see just how many conversation were happening about Black Friday this year using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

Looking for mentions of “Black Friday” or the “#BlackFriday” hashtag on Friday November 28th, we found over 3.5 million social mentions on just that single day. That was 17,330 blog posts, 31,221 online news articles, 51,741 forum postings and 3,426,440 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Black Friday

While shopping is sometimes seen as something women prefer to do over men, when we looked a little bit deeper into those Black Friday tweets on Nov. 28th, we actually found that men were tweeting more about it than women by just barely more at 52% vs 48%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary for Black Friday

Now, if you think that 3.5 million conversations about shopping sales in a single day is a lot, you’re probably right. In fact, when we looked at the mentions of Black Friday for the week culminating on the 28th, we actually found that mentions on the day were half of all the mentions. From November 22nd through the 28th the total mentions of Black Friday across social channels was just over 7 million.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for the Week of Black Friday

When we trend those numbers out across the week, we can actually see just how much the mentions of Black Friday rise until the day actually hits. Most of the week before seems to have a few mentions happening each day, but we can really see people starting to prepare and talk about Black Friday on the 27th (which is the American Thanksgiving). But then on the 28th, when Black Friday hits, the numbers just skyrocket.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart for the Week of Black Friday

When we dug deeper into Twitter mentions for the whole week, we found that men and women equaled out in their shares of mentions. What’s more interesting though, is the actual number of tweets that occurred. Even if we minus the number of tweets we showed above that happened on Black Friday (3,426,440) we still have 3.3 million tweets that mentioned Black Friday leading up to the actual day. This is very different than we saw in a post that we did back in 2012 that showed only 1.1 million tweets in the two weeks leading up to Black Friday. That means talk of Black Friday has tripled in those two years.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary of the Week of Black Friday

Now, just to be fair, since yesterday was “Cyber Monday,” we thought it would be interesting to also compare the mentions of that to Black Friday. We were really surprised with what we found here.

Many financial publications speculated over the weekend that Black Friday sales weren’t as high this year because people were waiting buy their stuff online instead on Cyber Monday. However, when we looked at how many times “Cyber Monday” or the hashtag “#CyberMonday” was used yesterday we were very surprised. Mentions of Cyber Monday didn’t even hit the 1 million mark yesterday. There was only 7,099 blog posts, 13,065 online news articles, 10,703 forum postings and 806,668 tweets yesterday containing our key terms.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Cyber Monday

Now none of these mentions have any real effect on what sales were like, but we were surprised to see the low number of mentions of Cyber Monday yesterday.

What do you think is happening here? Are people done with the big shopping sales day? Or people just not talking about it as much through social media? Let us know what you think in the comments.

The World Watches #Ferguson Through Social Media

Ferguson Police (image via Reuters)Last night most of North America and people around the world were glued to the televisions as they awaited the the Grand Jury’s decision on indictment charges of an officer in Ferguson, Missouri who shot and killed 18 year-old Michael Brown in August.

The build-up to last night’s decision was a long time in the making as people believed that Michael Brown’s death was unnecessary and the cause of poor race-relations not just in Ferguson, but across the United States. Claims that Brown had surrendered before the officer opened fire, led the general public to believe that race was the real issue at hand and not the crime the young man may have committed just before the shooting. This has led to protests, sometimes violent, and lots of talk about the situation both in Ferguson and around the world since the shooting on August 9th.

We were also watching and waiting to hear the decision last night. We were also tracking talk of Ferguson through social channels using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

Just before the press conference to announce the Grand jury’s decision, at 8:20pm(EST), mentions of “Ferguson” or the hashtag “#Ferguson,” which has become the official hashtag people have been using to talk about this topic, were above 613,000 across blogs, forums, online news and Twitter.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at  8:20pm

At the time that the press conference started, around 9:10pm(EST), the number of mentions of Ferguson had risen by over 200,000 to 838,695 mentions across those same channels.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 9:10pm

The full press conference, including the question period, in which they announced that they would not be indicting Officer Darren Wilson took about an hour. At 10:10pm mentions of Ferguson had risen to over 2 million for the day. Many of these started to come in as soon as the news of the no charges was said, but we waited until the entire press conference was over to check these numbers.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 10:05pm

After the press conference, protesters started to voice their anger at the decision. Many people in Ferguson started to riot and others around the United States who stood in support started their own protests. Many people sat at home and watched these events unfold through their televisions and online. At 11:10pm(EST) the number of mentions of Ferguson had risen by another million to over 3 million.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 11:10pm

The rioting and demonstrations continued long into the night. We looked back at all of the mentions of Ferguson that accumulated over the entire day (Novemeber 24th). Over the entire day, mentions of Ferguson surpassed 3.9 million mentions across blogs, forums, online news and Twitter.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for November 24th

While yesterday created a lot of social media action around Ferguson, as expected, this is an issue that has been bubbling for quite some time. The hashtag “#Ferguson” and references to the whole situation have been happening since August 9th, the day that Michael Brown was shot. We pulled up some data from August 9th up until today to help illustrate this.

Since August 9th to today, Ferguson has been the topic of over 29.7 million social conversations. Ferguson has been mentioned in 168,200 blog posts, 452,673 online news articles, 376,132 forum postings and 28,767,440 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

In that same time, we’ve also found 120,086 videos posted across various video sites that contain “Ferguson” in either their titles or descriptions.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity

On Tumblr, there have been 6,685,980 different posts about Ferguson since August 9th.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Activity

And even on Instagram, we were able to find 566,760 photos that have been tagged with the #Ferguson hashtag.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity

All of these mentions across various social media channels has been building up to yesterday. We plotted the mentions out over time and found that mentions were high towards the beginning of the whole ordeal as riots and protests were happening in Ferguson and police were retaliating with military grade weapons and tactics. After those initial protests calmed down, so did the talk, but not completely. There was a steady stream of conversation around Ferguson that occurred over the next 3 months, but they were all overshadowed in our graph by the spike that came after last night’s announcement.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

And while this issue stemmed from the United States, the whole world has been watching and joining in on the conversation over the past 3 months. A look at where mentions of Ferguson were coming from shows that the majority of the conversation was coming from the United States (72.8%), but a look at our geo location heat map of where tweets were originating from shows that people across the globe had an eye on what was going on and something to say about it.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

While the trial of Officer Darren Wilson may be over, we have a feeling that the conversation around this will continue for quite some time and that “Ferguson” will still be used not as a hub for activity, but as a hashtag and theme that will bring people together to connect and talk.