Posts Tagged ‘analytics’

Best of 2014: Who Goes First In The NFL Social Draft? [Infographic]

Sporting events are always a big draw for people to jump on Twitter. To that end, football fans in America start getting excited for their season way before the first kick-off. They start getting excited months before when the NFL does it’s yearly draft.

We tried to predict the order that players would get drafted in based on the chatter around top seeded college players. As it turns out, online popularity doesn’t always make you the best athlete. In this year’s official draft the player that went first was Jadeveon Clowney, however, we had him ranked to go second. Our number pick based on online buzz actually got drafted 22nd.

However, this was still one of our most popular posts of 2014, so feel free to check out our picks based on buzz below and compare them to the actual draft order.

This post was first published on May 8, 2014:
It’s draft day in the NFL.

For many football fans, this is one of the most exciting days of the year. Today we find out which of the top college football players get to see their dreams come true as they get selected to play for NFL teams.

Analysts have been speculating over which players will go to which teams in which round of the draft for weeks. Maybe even months. But analysts aren’t the only ones who think they know what they’re talking about. There’s a lot of football fans out there and a lot of them think they know better than the analysts.

Today, before the draft kicks off (get it?), we want to put those fans’ voices to the test.

We took the top 10 ranked players on CBS Sports’ NFL Draft Prospects list and ran their names and Twitter handles through our MAP software to see how many times they were mentioned and their sentiment in the past month along side the word “draft.” The results of new ranking are in the infographic below.

Is the order different than the analyst rankings? Very.

Sysomos NFL Draft 2014 Social Prospect Rankings Infographic

 

Do you think the fans can know more collectively than the official rankings? Let us know in the comments before the actual draft takes place.

Giving Tuesday Gets Bigger In 2014

Giving TuesdayOn Tuesday we took a look at some of the social numbers behind the people talking about Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year. But there’s one other important day that has come in to play to help kick off the holiday season in the past few years; Giving Tuesday.

Last year, we wrote about Giving Tuesday on the Marketwired blog, which was only in it’s second year of existence. While 2013 was just the second year that Giving Tuesday existed, it was only the first year we had heard about it. The idea of Giving Tuesday was born from the idea that after Americans have spent a weekend on buying things for themselves and loved ones on Black Friday through Cyber Monday, there should be a day where people can help others, which is also in line with the holiday spirit of giving.

Since last year was only the second year of Giving Tuesday’s existence, we looked at how much spread the idea had got through social media. Well, now that Giving Tuesday has had it’s third year of doing good for others, we thought it would be interesting to use MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see how it grew in 2014.

In 2013, “Giving Tuesday” or the hashtag “#GivingTuesday” appeared in about 472,000 social conversations across blogs, online news, forums and tweets. This year we saw the number of mentions rise by over 100,000. This year we found Giving Tuesday being talked about in 1,218 blog posts, 7,649 online news articles, 259 forum postings and 570,016 tweets on just December 2nd. Interestingly, most of that jump of 100,000 mentions happened on Twitter as the other three channels we looked at actually dropped.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Since Twitter was the main driver of conversation this year, we dug a little bit deeper into what happened there. As it turns out, the number of tweets about Giving Tuesday jumped from about 19,000 mentions an hour last year to almost 24,000 mentions an hour this year. Also interesting was that we found who was tweeting about it also changed. Last year women tweeted more about Giving Tuesday than men at 52% to 48%. This year that gap widened though. In 2014 even more women were talking about Giving Tuesday and the gap grew to 54% vs 46%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

Last year we also found that 74.7% of the Giving Tuesday tweets came from the United States. This year, that number grew to 75.3% of all the tweets. But just because the United States seems to be the most involved in Giving Tuesday doesn’t make them the only ones. When we pulled up our geo-location heat map of where tweets were originating from we can actually see that people from around the world were tweeting and taking part in Giving Tuesday.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Last year we also looked at how popular the #GivingTuesday hashtag was on Instagram. Last year we found 17,630 pictures tagged with the hashtag. This year though, that number rose to 70,708… which is a fantastic rise for a great event.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

The best rise in activity that we found this year though was through the sentiment around Giving Tuesday in social channels. Last year 40% of the conversation was positive, while 13% was negative. However, this year, positive sentiment around Giving Tuesday rose to 57% and negative sentiment shrunk to 2%.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

We were really happy to see that Giving Tuesday has seen a rise in awareness in the social sphere. We hope that it goes up even more for next year.

We’re curious to know how charities saw a rise on Giving Tuesday though. If you work for or with a charity, please leave us a comment and let us know what you saw happen on Giving Tuesday and how it changed from last year.

Black Friday by the Social Numbers

Black Friday SaleNumbers vary on depending on where you look, but a lot of people seem to think that Black Friday this year didn’t generate the sales numbers that retailers were looking for. In fact, a lot of outlets are claiming that Black Friday sales numbers this year went down when compared to last year.

But sales numbers aside, Black Friday was still event that people were talking about. And a lot of that talk and sharing of sales and deals was happening though social media.

We decided to take a quick look to see just how many conversation were happening about Black Friday this year using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

Looking for mentions of “Black Friday” or the “#BlackFriday” hashtag on Friday November 28th, we found over 3.5 million social mentions on just that single day. That was 17,330 blog posts, 31,221 online news articles, 51,741 forum postings and 3,426,440 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Black Friday

While shopping is sometimes seen as something women prefer to do over men, when we looked a little bit deeper into those Black Friday tweets on Nov. 28th, we actually found that men were tweeting more about it than women by just barely more at 52% vs 48%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary for Black Friday

Now, if you think that 3.5 million conversations about shopping sales in a single day is a lot, you’re probably right. In fact, when we looked at the mentions of Black Friday for the week culminating on the 28th, we actually found that mentions on the day were half of all the mentions. From November 22nd through the 28th the total mentions of Black Friday across social channels was just over 7 million.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for the Week of Black Friday

When we trend those numbers out across the week, we can actually see just how much the mentions of Black Friday rise until the day actually hits. Most of the week before seems to have a few mentions happening each day, but we can really see people starting to prepare and talk about Black Friday on the 27th (which is the American Thanksgiving). But then on the 28th, when Black Friday hits, the numbers just skyrocket.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart for the Week of Black Friday

When we dug deeper into Twitter mentions for the whole week, we found that men and women equaled out in their shares of mentions. What’s more interesting though, is the actual number of tweets that occurred. Even if we minus the number of tweets we showed above that happened on Black Friday (3,426,440) we still have 3.3 million tweets that mentioned Black Friday leading up to the actual day. This is very different than we saw in a post that we did back in 2012 that showed only 1.1 million tweets in the two weeks leading up to Black Friday. That means talk of Black Friday has tripled in those two years.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary of the Week of Black Friday

Now, just to be fair, since yesterday was “Cyber Monday,” we thought it would be interesting to also compare the mentions of that to Black Friday. We were really surprised with what we found here.

Many financial publications speculated over the weekend that Black Friday sales weren’t as high this year because people were waiting buy their stuff online instead on Cyber Monday. However, when we looked at how many times “Cyber Monday” or the hashtag “#CyberMonday” was used yesterday we were very surprised. Mentions of Cyber Monday didn’t even hit the 1 million mark yesterday. There was only 7,099 blog posts, 13,065 online news articles, 10,703 forum postings and 806,668 tweets yesterday containing our key terms.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Cyber Monday

Now none of these mentions have any real effect on what sales were like, but we were surprised to see the low number of mentions of Cyber Monday yesterday.

What do you think is happening here? Are people done with the big shopping sales day? Or people just not talking about it as much through social media? Let us know what you think in the comments.

The World Watches #Ferguson Through Social Media

Ferguson Police (image via Reuters)Last night most of North America and people around the world were glued to the televisions as they awaited the the Grand Jury’s decision on indictment charges of an officer in Ferguson, Missouri who shot and killed 18 year-old Michael Brown in August.

The build-up to last night’s decision was a long time in the making as people believed that Michael Brown’s death was unnecessary and the cause of poor race-relations not just in Ferguson, but across the United States. Claims that Brown had surrendered before the officer opened fire, led the general public to believe that race was the real issue at hand and not the crime the young man may have committed just before the shooting. This has led to protests, sometimes violent, and lots of talk about the situation both in Ferguson and around the world since the shooting on August 9th.

We were also watching and waiting to hear the decision last night. We were also tracking talk of Ferguson through social channels using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

Just before the press conference to announce the Grand jury’s decision, at 8:20pm(EST), mentions of “Ferguson” or the hashtag “#Ferguson,” which has become the official hashtag people have been using to talk about this topic, were above 613,000 across blogs, forums, online news and Twitter.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at  8:20pm

At the time that the press conference started, around 9:10pm(EST), the number of mentions of Ferguson had risen by over 200,000 to 838,695 mentions across those same channels.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 9:10pm

The full press conference, including the question period, in which they announced that they would not be indicting Officer Darren Wilson took about an hour. At 10:10pm mentions of Ferguson had risen to over 2 million for the day. Many of these started to come in as soon as the news of the no charges was said, but we waited until the entire press conference was over to check these numbers.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 10:05pm

After the press conference, protesters started to voice their anger at the decision. Many people in Ferguson started to riot and others around the United States who stood in support started their own protests. Many people sat at home and watched these events unfold through their televisions and online. At 11:10pm(EST) the number of mentions of Ferguson had risen by another million to over 3 million.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary at 11:10pm

The rioting and demonstrations continued long into the night. We looked back at all of the mentions of Ferguson that accumulated over the entire day (Novemeber 24th). Over the entire day, mentions of Ferguson surpassed 3.9 million mentions across blogs, forums, online news and Twitter.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for November 24th

While yesterday created a lot of social media action around Ferguson, as expected, this is an issue that has been bubbling for quite some time. The hashtag “#Ferguson” and references to the whole situation have been happening since August 9th, the day that Michael Brown was shot. We pulled up some data from August 9th up until today to help illustrate this.

Since August 9th to today, Ferguson has been the topic of over 29.7 million social conversations. Ferguson has been mentioned in 168,200 blog posts, 452,673 online news articles, 376,132 forum postings and 28,767,440 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

In that same time, we’ve also found 120,086 videos posted across various video sites that contain “Ferguson” in either their titles or descriptions.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity

On Tumblr, there have been 6,685,980 different posts about Ferguson since August 9th.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Activity

And even on Instagram, we were able to find 566,760 photos that have been tagged with the #Ferguson hashtag.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity

All of these mentions across various social media channels has been building up to yesterday. We plotted the mentions out over time and found that mentions were high towards the beginning of the whole ordeal as riots and protests were happening in Ferguson and police were retaliating with military grade weapons and tactics. After those initial protests calmed down, so did the talk, but not completely. There was a steady stream of conversation around Ferguson that occurred over the next 3 months, but they were all overshadowed in our graph by the spike that came after last night’s announcement.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

And while this issue stemmed from the United States, the whole world has been watching and joining in on the conversation over the past 3 months. A look at where mentions of Ferguson were coming from shows that the majority of the conversation was coming from the United States (72.8%), but a look at our geo location heat map of where tweets were originating from shows that people across the globe had an eye on what was going on and something to say about it.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

While the trial of Officer Darren Wilson may be over, we have a feeling that the conversation around this will continue for quite some time and that “Ferguson” will still be used not as a hub for activity, but as a hashtag and theme that will bring people together to connect and talk.

John Oliver Gets Spreading Information In The Social Age

Last Week Tonight with John OliverYou can debate back and forth for days on whether Last Week Tonight is a news program or a comedy and entertainment show… or even both. But one thing you can’t debate is that John Oliver has been instrumental in opening the eyes of his viewers to subjects that they should probably know more about.

And when we say viewers, we don’t just mean the people who watch his show live on HBO, we mean everyone that has seen the numerous clips from John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight since it debuted at the end of April this year.

Yes, the show we’re talking about is an HBO program, which means that viewers need to subscribe to HBO through their cable company to see the show live as it airs on Sunday nights. However, what John Oliver’s show has done that not many other shows do, especially ones on premium cable subscription channels, is found a way to make his interesting content very sharable by putting all of his segments up on YouTube.

And this is why we say that John Oliver gets it. He knows that if you want your content to spread it has to be three things; interesting, entertaining and sharable. Last Week Tonight is all three of these, which is why it got so popular so fast.

We used MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to dig a little deeper on the social phenomenon that is is John Oliver’s brand of entertaining news.

Since Last Week Tonight debuted at the end of April this year, the show’s name or John Oliver have appeared in over 818,000 social media posts.  Mentions have appeared in 14,496 blog posts, 17,346 online news articles, 26,152 forum postings and 760,222 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

There has also been, over the same time period, 11,973 videos posted that have John Oliver or Last Week Tonight mentioned in their titles or descriptions. And, to add to that, only 83 of those videos come from the show’s own YouTube channel.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

While the number of mentions that John Oliver and Last Week Tonight have received since their show debuted is by no means an astronomical number, it’s really what was in those posts and how many people saw them that mattered. And what was in them, was videos from their YouTube channel.

You see, John Oliver and Last Week Tonight knew that not everyone has an HBO subscription. So they made their content easy to find and share somewhere else, the world’s second largest search engine, YouTube. And it’s been working for them.

We pulled up some of the stats from the Last Week Tonight YouTube page. What we found that the channel has over a million subscribers. Even better though is that the 83 videos posted to the channel have amassed over 150 million views. That’s not bad since the channel has only existed for just about 6 months.

Sysomos MAP - YouTube Channel Analysis

Even more impressive is when we looked at which of his videos were the most popular. The top five most popular videos from the channel weren’t the short funny little two minute videos. All five of them were the show’s longer form feature stories that average around 14 minutes in runtime.

Sysomos MAP - Most Viewed Videos On Last Week Tonight's YouTube Channel

Even more interesting though is when we go back to the social mentions of John Oliver and Last Week Tonight we started talking about. When we look at those mentions on our popularity chart, which plots out the mentions over time, we can see a bunch of large spikes in conversation. All of them, including the largest spike on August 18th, happen on Mondays, the day after the show airs on HBO. People would literally be waiting for the videos to go up the next morning so they could see them and share them.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

So, what can you learn from John Oliver and Last Week Tonight?

The main take-aways we see here is that there is no magic length for how long a blog post or a video should be to optimize how much your content gets shared through social media. Your content should be as long as it needs to, as long as you can keep it interesting, entertaining and make it easily sharable. If you can do that, people will be anxiously waiting for your content so they can see it and share it.

And now, just for fun and so those of you not familiar with the show can understand what we’re talking about, here’s one of our favourite clips from the first season of Last Week Tonight (of course it has to do with the internet):

 

Taylor Swift vs Spotify

Taylor Swift - 1989There can be little debate that Taylor Swift is the hottest thing in music today (I mean, come on. That “Shake it off” song is so just happy and catchy).

There’s also little room for debate that the music industry is very different today than a decade ago, with streaming services being favoured more and more over actually buying albums.

If both of these things are true, then why has Taylor Swift decided to remove all of her music from Spotify, the largest of the streaming music services?

Last week, Swift released her latest album, 1989. However, users of streaming services like Spotify noticed that the album wasn’t on any of the streaming services on the release date. While disappointing, this isn’t very uncommon. A bunch of artists have chose to hold off on adding their albums to streaming services for a few weeks after release to drive initial album sales. And this tactic worked for Swift, as she saw over 1.3 million album sales in the first week, making 1989 the biggest first week for an album since Eminem’s 2002 The Eminem Show.

However, not releasing her new album to the streaming services was just the first step. On Monday, Taylor Swift pulled her entire catalogue of music off of Spotify. A move that many are questioning and talking about.

We decided to look at the conversation around this topic using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, by searching for mentions of Taylor Swift and Spotify that have appeared together in the past 3 days. In that time we found just under 80,000 mentions across social channels like Twitter, blogs, forums and online news sites. By no means is this a large amount, but it does start to show that the topic is on people’s minds.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

There’s also been 249 videos created over the past 3 days that mention both Swift and Spotify in their title or descriptions. Many of these videos question why the artist would do such a thing and many more plead for Taylor to put her music back up so they can listen to it.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

This cry is being heard around the world. When we looked at where all of the talk was coming from we found that the United States was making the most noise about the subject (over 52% of it), but a lot of other countries were also talking about. Under the pie chart is a heat map of where tweets mentioning T-Swift and Spotify were coming from and you can see that Twitter users across the globe are talking about this.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

We also looked at some of these tweets that were happening. The most retweeted tweet that we’ve found on the subject comes from Spotify’s own Twitter account. Spotify made a very clever tweet of a playlist they put together trying to get Taylor Swift to come back to them.

 

While the numbers that we’re seeing right now around this subject aren’t earth shattering, they do make us start to think about this new world we’ve embraced.

With so many companies these days seeing the value in being social, sharing and streaming their content, why has the biggest artist in the world right now decided to go the opposite route? Let us know your thoughts on this in the comments.

Will this be a permanent thing? And if so, will Spotify be able to shake it off? (See what I did there?)

Sysomos Data Being Used By Bloomberg Politics To Show Issues Driving The Midterm Election

We always love when we come across clients using Sysomos to do amazing things. Here’s one of the latest:

 

With the United States having their midterm elections today, you can be sure that a lot of people have been voicing their opinions on the issues via social media for the past few weeks, probably even months. But how can you tell which ones are at the forefront people’s minds?

Well, if you’re Bloomberg Politics, you decide to start looking for the signs in what people are saying, reading and seeing. And that’s exactly what they did when Bloomberg Politics launched their “What’s Driving The Week?” site.

Bloomberg Politics Issue Tracker

On this site, Bloomberg Politics has taken what they believed to be the 10 most important issues on the American public’s mind and then ranked them according to their mentions across Twitter, the news, and campaign ads. Bloomberg says that the rankings of issues are based on:

  • “Twitter served to gauge the public’s interest in the issues. Using Sysomos, a [social] media monitoring company, we made complex search queries to find tweets that were relevant to the campaign or public policy–and tried to weed out those that weren’t.
  • To measure how much attention the issues have received in the news media, we searched a database of 55,000 mainstream news sources from Sysomos.
  • Campaign ads served as a proxy for how much attention candidates have paid to the 10 issues. Using data from Kantar Media’s Campaign Media Analysis Group, which tracks political ads on national and local broadcast television and national cable networks, we counted how many times ads aired that included mentions of the issues.”

The team over at Bloomberg Politics then takes each category and scores it out of 100, with a 0 being the issue being talked about least in a medium, 100 for the most and the others scored proportionately in between. The three categories are then added together for each issue, averaged out and then the issues are ranked in order.

Not only are the issues ranked by the talk they’ve received across the United States, but Bloomberg Politics also breaks the them down by state. Clicking on an issue reveals a visual representation of how much each issue is being discussed in each of the 50 states by the size of a states bubble. The colour of each bubble also reveals if the issue has grown or decreased in talk from the week before.

Bloomberg Politics Issue Tracker - State View

So, if you’re American, before you go vote today why not see what issues are most important in your state.

 

Are you doing something cool with Sysomos data you think we should feature? Let us know by reaching out to community@sysomos.com.

#GamerGate: Lots of Noise, Not A Lot of Clear Direction

man_yelling_at_computerThere’s a not-so-secret war happening online as we speak.

A lot of people can say that they’ve heard of or seen the #GamerGate hashtag, but not too many people can say for certain what it’s about anymore.

To be fair, there was a clear set of events that set off #GamerGate, long before the movement even started using the hashtag. However, the war has grown and mutated since then in so many directions. People entrenched in #GamerGate have a good idea of what they’re fighting over, but those outside don’t seem to have a clue.

While the intent of this post is to look at how #GamerGate has spread across social media, it’s important to explain some of the background, which I will attempt to do without upsetting either side of the argument.

Around the middle of August, the ex-boyfriend of a female game developer wrote a blog post about how his ex had cheated on him while they were together. In the post he named some names of some men that he believed she had cheated on him with. Usually, a post like this would mostly go unnoticed on the internet. However, of the names named in the post many were notable names in the gaming world, such as game journalists and game award judges, and they had all been known to say good things and/or promote the female game developers games.

This brought light to the gaming industry that maybe they weren’t getting the un-biased judgement they thought they were around game reviews and awards. This started an uprising within the gaming world where average gamers started calling people out and demanding for some ethics from the gaming journalists.

At this point, there started to become two factions of this fight. The first faction was just fighting others and calling for a reasonable standard of ethics in the industry so regular consumers felt that they were getting fair reviews of games they wanted to spend money on. The second faction was saying that gamers were just upset because women had become part of gaming culture and that people were attacking them trying to keep it a “boys only club.”

It was during this initial uprising the actor Adam Baldwin (from Firefly and Chuck) tweeted the hashtag #GamerGate on August 27th referring to the controversy and the hashtag took off from there.

After this point in the story the water becomes a bit murky. The hashtag #GamerGate grew into a larger thing with many fights happening on many sides. Some are using the hashtag to fight the fight of ethics in gaming journalism. Some are using it to fight against what they believe is misogyny in the world of video games. Some are fighting for what they believe are feminists trying to ruin their gaming culture. And some are fighting just to fight.

It actually has gotten very messy with some people getting personally threatened or attacked and a lot of name calling on either side. I’d prefer not to go in further details. However, if you’d like a good look at what else has happened in the #GamerGate saga, I’ve found this article on Know Your Meme seems to have a fairly unbiased timeline you can follow.

Now, back to the original point of this article….

With so much of the #GamerGate war happening online, I thought it would be interesting to use MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to look at just how big it’s gotten.

As I stated above, the hashtag #GamerGate didn’t exist until the end of August, despite the whole controversy starting two weeks before that. However, since the time the hashtag came into play it’s been used almost 4 million times across social media channels. I was able to find 5,130 blog posts, 3,414 online news articles, 38,606 forum postings and 3,842,346 tweets all making mention of #GamerGate.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

In addition to those channels, there has also been 11,165 videos created in this time that make mention of #GamerGate in their title or description.

Sysomos MAP - Summary of Video Activity

While some movements start out strong and then start to fade, the opposite has been true for #GamerGate. A look at our popularity graph, which plots out all of those mentions over time, shows that the #GamerGate hashtag has actually gained popularity since the end of August when it started being used. This seems to be due to two main factors. The first is that more people are starting to hear about the movement and are trying to get in on the action on all sides of the fight. The second, which correlates to the largest spike we can see in the chart below came when a well known feminist speaker had her life threatened by someone claiming to be part of the #GamerGate movement, which garnered a lot of attention from mainstream sources. The second large spike came from another threat that was aimed at a woman speaking about looking for social equality, which again spiked more main stream sources to look at the #GamerGate controversy.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

Interestingly, when I looked for the most retweeted tweets about #GamerGate, I found that the majority of them had to do with the fight of the sexes going on within #GamerGate. However, the second most retweeted tweet was a plea from someone asking that #GamerGate be used only to talk about the initial cause of the whole thing, ethics in gaming in journalism. Unfortunately, it’s the fighting and few bad things that have happened in the sex war faction of #GamerGate that has garnered the most attention around the whole issue.

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

When I looked at some text analytics around the #GamerGate controversy, I found that you can actually see all of the different kinds of fights going on within. Both our buzzgraph and word cloud reveal that there is a lot of talk about both the journalism aspect that started the whole thing and the sexism (on both sides of sexism) that is coming to the forefront. I won’t comment on either, but see the word cloud and buzzgraph below to see for yourself.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

Sysomos MAP - Word Cloud

While it’s hard to know what #GamerGate is really all about anymore, and I’ll let you make up your mind about this, one thing is for sure; no one is happy about any of it. A look at the sentiment from all of the #GamerGate conversations across social media shows that an overwhelming 40% of all conversations is negative.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

Again, my intention of this post was not to be in support of any side of this, but simply to show the world how big #GamerGate actually is despite many people not even knowing what it is about.

2014 World Series Social Prediction

2014 World SeriesWhile baseball may be known as the sport of the summer, everyone knows that the real excitement doesn’t even start until October.

In October the top teams play and vie for their chance to be in the MLB World Series.

Well, those teams have all played and starting tonight we will all bare witness to the San Francisco Giants and the Kansas City Royals kick off their best of seven series to see who will be crowned the 2014 World Series champions.

It promises to be an incredibly exciting series. The Giants have been a powerhouse team for the past few years. This will be their third trip to the World Series since 2010 and they won both of their previous times here. On the other side, the Royals haven’t even made it into the MLB playoffs in 29 years, but battled their way through this year and now have a chance to take it all.

It’s really very exciting.

As we’ve done in previous years, we thought it would be fun to take a look at both of these teams and how they’ve appeared in social media over the 2014 season using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see if that data can predict a World Series winner.

First, we started our assessment by looking up mentions of both teams over the course of the season (March 22 to October 20). In that time, we found the Giants mentioned in over 10 million social media conversations. They appeared in 191,057 blog posts, 563,685 online news articles, 279,624 forum postings and 9,737,47 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for the San Francisco Giants

Meanwhile, the Royals were mentioned in almost 7 million conversations. We found the Royals appear in 80,985 blog posts, 280,674 online news articles, 242,175 forum postings and 6,287,126 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for the Kansas City Royals

For perspective, we’ve also brought those numbers up as a pie chart for side by side comparison. This shows that out of both teams the Giants lead the way of social mentions with 61% of the conversation while the Royals make up the remaining 39%.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Comparison

As well, side by side in a channel breakdown, you can see that the Giants clearly got more mentions in each individual medium.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Comparison by Source

A look at mentions of both teams shows that throughout the entire season the Giants had a more vocal fan base. The Giants saw more volume of conversation throughout the entire season aside from when the Royals found that they were moving on past the regular season. When the Royals moved into the playoffs there was a huge spike in mentions of the team due to the fact this was the first time they had been in the post-season in 29 years.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Comparison Over Time

The number of mentions don’t mean everything though. Because of this, we also dove into the sentiment around each team… and actually found some interesting results.

Throughout the season the Royals showed a 83% favourable rating. We found that 27% of the talk about the Royals was positive while 17% was negative.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment of the Kansas City Royals

When we looked at the sentiment around the Giants though, we found that most of it seemed to be in the neutral range (which was strange, so we ran the query multiple times but always came to the same results). The Giants showed a 96% favourable rating. There was an odd 1% of positive sentiment around the Giants and only 4% negative chatter.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment of the San Francisco Giants

What does this all mean though?

Well, technically all it means is that the San Francisco Giants have a much more vocal fan base than the Kansas City Royals. In fact, earlier in the season the Royals coach called out the fans for not showing enough support for their team.

However, if we want to use this data to try and predict a World Series winner, we would have to crown the Giants to take it all. Their fans have been more vocal about the team both in terms of volume and favourable talk.

So, our prediction is that the San Francisco Giants will take the World Series over the Kansas City Royals.

But since this isn’t a real science around actual player performance, only time will tell who will really walk away as the 2014 World Series champions.

Who do you think is going to take the World Series this year?

Just How Popular Is Ello?

ElloEllo seems to be the favourite new kid on the social media block as of the past few weeks. Yesterday on the blog Mark even wrote about how many users are claiming they’re moving over to Ello to “escape” Facebook.

But is it really possible for Ello to replace Facebook?

In my personal opinion, I’d say not quite. For one thing (and this is my personal thought), I think that Ello feels a lot more like Twitter currently than Facebook. And secondly, and probably most importantly, in order for Ello to actually replace Facebook in people’s lives, the exodus over to the new network would have to be enormous. The only way that Ello could replace Facebook is if all of your friends and contacts that you’ve connected with over the years all moved there. That will take a very long time… if it happens at all.

But even with my personal thoughts on Ello, I wondered just how popular Ello has actually become in the past few weeks?

On September 26th, just as Ello was starting to go viral, Vox (along with many other sources) reported that the network was receiving 31,000 invite requests an hour. That seems pretty popular to me.

To investigate further, I decided to see what conversations were happening on other social networks about this new social network (very meta, I know).

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, I looked up mentions of Ello over the past month. One hindrance to my search though was that I could only search for English conversations because “ello” in Spanish translates to “it” making it a very common word. So, please keep that in mind when looking at the information below.

If you follow the big names and outlets that talk a lot about social media, you may feel like you’ve been over hearing about Ello. However, when I conducted my search for conversations about the new network I found less than 350,000 mentions of it. In the past month, Ello only came up in 3,042 blog posts, 3,321 online news articles, 3,716 forum postings and 332,692 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

While those numbers may not be as big as people who are hearing about it nonstop may expect, it’s also interesting to note that the majority of those conversations have only happened in the past two weeks.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart Without Twitter Data

Since Ello is being dubbed the “anti-Facebook” it made sense for me to also search public Facebook data to see how much it was being talked about there. Again, the number of Ello mentions I found there was not quite as large as I initially thought it was going to be. That said, it has still accounted for 28,598 mentions in public status updates. Also interesting is that if you look at the three examples in the screenshot below, you’ll notice that a lot of the mentions are people posting a link to their new Ello account on Facebook. It’s interesting because people feel the need to use Facebook to tell their friends that they’ve joined the “anti-Facebook.”

Sysomos MAP - Facebook Activity Summary

As with any new social network, people want to understand it and why they should consider grabbing real-estate there. To help with that, there’s already been just over 1,000 videos created that try to explain Ello to others.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

So, what are people saying about Ello so far? A look at both our buzzgraph and word clouds around the network show that “Facebook” seems to be one of the most used words when people talk about Ello. There is also a significant talk about Ello’s “manifesto”. This manifesto is what seems to be the appeal behind Ello, as it states that people will have more “privacy” as they will never sell your “data” for “advertising.” However, that’s also making people question how the network will stay in “business” for a sustained amount of time.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

Sysomos MAP - Word Cloud

The other thing that I found interesting about the apparent popularity of Ello revealed itself when I used our Influencer Community tool to see the groups of people that were talking about it. If you’re anything like me, and I assume you might be since you’re reading this blog, you probably follow a lot of sources online that talk about news and trends in the digital and social media space. Well, those are the types of sources seem to be the ones who are perpetuating the talk of Ello. If you look at the big blue community, it’s filled with popular sources for social media news like Forbes Tech, Gigaom and Medium, but also with social media influencers such as @briansolis and @AmyVernon. So, while it may seem to people who work in and follow the social media space that Ello is all the rage, it may really just be the social media people getting each other excited in a big circle.

Interesting as well is that the second largest community I found, in orange below, is a big group of celebrities (mostly from the music industry). When I investigated that group a bit further it seems that fans are tweeting to find out if their favourite celebrities are on Ello yet and where they can find them there.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Influencer Communities

While the real fate of Ello is still up in the air, being that it’s only been popular for a bout two weeks now, it does seem to have a lot of fans. A look at the sentiment around the network shows that it’s 86% favourable.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment Summary

So, what do you think about Ello so far? Is it going to replace Facebook or is it just going to see some hype for a little while and then fall off? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.