Posts Tagged ‘analytics’

Shark Week Puts Up Impressive Numbers Despite Backlash

Shark WeekAnother Shark Week has come and gone.

Everyone’s favourite week of television devoted to the worlds most cunning killing machine has just finished running for it’s 27th time. Yes, Shark Week has been an annual event on Discovery Channel since 1988 making it the longest running cable television programming event in history.

With such a long running history that pulls in millions of viewers a year, we were curious just how popular the event was on social media. To find out, we did a little digging on the social media numbers behind Shark Week by looking up mentions of it using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

We looked for mentions of #sharkweek OR “shark week” OR #sharkweek14 OR #sharkweek2014 and found 2,138 blog posts, 3,296 online news articles, 692 forum postings and 1,647,658 tweets between August 10-17.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

During the same time period we found 85,772 posts on Tumblr of all sorts that also made mention of Shark Week.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Activity Summary

And on Facebook, we were able to find over 17,000 public status updates that were talking about Shark Week.

Sysomos MAP - Facebook Activity

These are pretty impressive numbers. But as we did a little more digging, we found that people didn’t seem to be as in to Shark Week as you might have thought. When we looked at how some of those numbers above played out over time in our popularity chart we found that Shark Week was a big deal when the week kicked off, but then tailed off as the week went on. Sunday August 10th was the first night of Shark Week and was the day that saw the most people talking about it. As the week progressed though people were talking less and less about Shark Week.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

Another disturbing thing that we found while looking at the numbers around Shark Week was that people seemed to be complaining about it. When we looked at the sentiment around the entire week of shark related programming we actually found that only 11% of the conversations about Shark Week came through as positive. At the same time, a whopping 40% of Shark Week conversations had a negative connotation.

Sysomos MAP - Sentiment Summary

Some of this negative talk may have been due to some of the programming that has come into play over the years during Shark Week is fictional stories about sharks, while it was traditionally a week about learning real facts about sharks. This year Shark Week kicked off with a special called Submarine Shark. The story was based off the tales of a giant shark in South Africa that was actually made up by reporters in the area to see if they could fool readers. The tale grew into an urban legend with people claiming to catch a glimpse of the shark, but no evidence ever surfacing. People felt duped because they thought they were watching a documentary about a real shark and took to social media to complain about it. However, Discovery Channel never claimed that any of it was real and the the Shark Week Twitter account even asked it’s followers if they believe that the shark exists.

Despite people’s feelings about getting tricked or knowing that some of the programming was fictional, there’s no doubt that the talk in social media definitely put up some good numbers and did its job of raising awareness for a week of “killer” programming.

Collective Mourning and Robin Williams

Robin WilliamsWe’ve talked numerous times on this blog about how social media can bring the world together over a single event.

Whether it was a finale of a much loved TV show, a sporting event, or, the unfortunate death of a beloved public figure, there seems to be a want for people to connect (if it’s just by sharing the experience or actually talking about it) over these events.

The latest event like this that we’ve witnessed was with the sad news of Robin Williams passing on Monday night.

Within minutes of the news becoming public social networks were flooded with mentions and talk of the actor. There are few people in the world who could say that they didn’t enjoy at least one Robin Williams film, whether it was a children’s favourite like Aladdin, something that made everyone laugh like Good Morning Vietnam or even a dramatic portrayal such as Williams in Good Will Hunting. The man had entertained the entire world at some point or another and we all knew that and it brought us together over his passing.

But an interesting article in the New York Times on Tuesday asked the question of why we collectively mourn through social media? While there was no definitive answer to the question because it could be many reasons; from showing respect to just feeling the need to express yourself about something or someone that moved you, but part of the answer may be so people can say, I was there, I was part of that… (sorry to call it this, but for lack of a better word) event.

And many many people were part of this event.

A simple search on MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics platform, for mentions of Robin Williams or the most used hashtag around the talk of #RIPRobinWilliams shows just how many peoples’ lives he touched, when many had never actually met the man.

At the time of writing this (on Wednesday afternoon) there have been millions of mentions across social channels. We were able to find mentions in 29,914 blog posts, 66,700 online news articles, 14,548 forum postings and 7,199,489 tweets all since Monday night when the news broke.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

In addition to those channels, we also found 14,151 videos that have mentioned the actor in their title or descriptions since Monday night.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

On Tumblr, the number of mentions in the same time frame showed 3,240,930 postings of various sorts.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Activity Grid

And the #RIPRobinWilliams hashtag has even been used 383,690 on Instagram.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

None of these are insignificant numbers.

After seeing these numbers it’s hard to call this anything but an event that brought the world together in a collective manner. But why?

We don’t have the answer and you may not either, but we want to know your opinion in the comments. Is the death of world renown person an “event”. Has it always been? Or has social media changed our idea of what an event is or can be?

Let us know below and let’s start a conversation about this.

Social media’s balance sheet

5_10_2013_15_08_38_bhnmo6cd32g63tp1nrb8i69n07_zpliyujvtzSocial media sites suffer from the ultimate business conundrum: they have customers, but they don’t always make money. The path to monetization is still long, convoluted and the experts are still drafting and debating best practices.

This week’s earnings report from Twitter reveals that one of the web’s biggest success stories still has untapped financial potential. Yet, Twitter is on a tear, setting up local offices around the world and hiring like mad. Its ever-growing staff is innovating like crazy, testing out a hashtag “translator” that explains some hashtag short-forms and debuting monetizing features such as organic tweet analytics.

While the business side of a social media site and its content interface seem like separate entities, in truth every online moment is deeply influenced by the money piles (or lack thereof) in the background.

Facebook may be ahead of other sites in achieving financial stability, but the experience for businesses and end users has gone through an often rough ride as the site has tried and tested dozens of ideas. Sites such as Foursquare, once a hopeful mainstream player that many small businesses got involved in, keeps pivoting and rebranding as it struggles to find an audience and income. Following the money on potential booms and busts helps you know who to invest in (and how much they’ll be asking for), and who to write-off. But since every monetization milestone on these sites not only costs you money, but often results in a surge of user complaints, you can’t keep your eye off the ROI for a second.

The bottom line is, businesses ARE the bottom line for social media sites. Few sites expect to make money off users, but they fully plan to dig deep into the pockets of B2B clients. Keep your eye on their finances, because they will be impacting your budget soon.

 

Jon Stewart And Fans Have Plans For CNN

Jon Stewart Starts A Kickstarter To Buy CNNOne of the great things about having access to Sysomos MAP, a tool that allows you to perform unlimited searches and receive unlimited results about what’s happening in social media, is that on a whim you can look up what people are saying about any trending topic or just things that interest you. You could imagine that around the Sysomos offices we use this quite often, both for serious and fun topics.

Here’s a topic that we’re currently having some fun watching:

Last week on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, they ran a story about how Rupert Murdoch, the man behind News Corp and all their media holdings, wants to buy Time Warner. However, the deal would mean that Murdoch would have to sell off Time Warner’s channel CNN because he already owns another 24/7 news channel, Fox News. When Jon Stewart heard the news, he had a brilliant idea… to buy CNN. So, he decided to do what anyone with big dreams would do in our modern age; start a Kickstarter campaign to make the dream come true.

While the idea made for a funny joke on the show last week, The Daily Show has decided to run with it for a bit longer.

On Tuesday’s episode of The Daily Show, Stewart came to a realization about his lofty plans; if he owned CNN, he’d also have to program the channel with original shows that can run 24/7.

 

Admitting that he couldn’t come up with all the ideas by himself, he turned to the public for help. Stewart asked fans to help him come with some ideas, not just for programs, but also for new technology and slogans for CNN. He did so by asking fans to tweet their ideas using the hashtags #NewCNNshows#NewCNNtech and #NewCNNslogans. 

The Daily Show Asks For Users Suggestions Via Hashtags

We’ve been watching these hashtags for fun and thought we’d share some of the “great” ideas that people have been offering by looking through some of the most retweeted ideas on each hashtag.

#NewCNNshows

Since Tuesday night we’ve found the #NewCNNshows hashtag used in 1,249 tweets (with more new ones being added all the time). That’s about 17 new show ideas an hour. This is also the hashtag that has seen the most use so far.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

Here’s a few of our favourites so far:

 

#NewCNNtech

The #NewCNNtech hashtag has been used the least with only 415 tweets so far, but has also produced some of the funniest ideas. (And apparently, people really like holograms)

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

 

Here’s some of our favourites so far:

#NewCNNslogans

The hashtag #NewCNNslogans has been used 930 times so far. This one has produced some of the meanest tweets towards CNN so far, but some of them will really make you chuckle.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

Here’s some of the funnier ones we found:

 

And to our friends at CNN, we want you to know that we don’t have anything against you, we just think that Jon Stewart and The Daily Show are hilarious.

 

 

Weird Al Knows How To Stay Relevant In The Digital Age

weird-al-mandatory-funIn a world where everyone is competing for attention via whatever screen happens to be in front of your eyes at the time, it may not always be that easy to get people to pay attention. Add to that, being a musical genius, but to a relatively niche audience, that’s been in the game for over 30 years. How do you get people to pay attention?

Well, if you’re Weird Al Yankovic, you go on a musical marathon across the web.

Last Tuesday, Weird Al, the king of the parody song, released his latest album entitled Mandatory Fun. But rather than let the record companies release one song as a single and handle the promotion, Al took matters into his own hands to make sure that his new songs spread across people’s computer screens.

Weird Al did a promo for his latest album by releasing a music video a day for songs from the album that was aptly called #8videos8days. Every day for 8 days a new Weird Al music video appeared online, but always in a different place, which really added to the genius of this promotion.

Weird Al is no stranger to stirring up attention when he has a new album release. Dating all the back to 1984, Weird Al would go on TV stations that played music videos (back then being MTV and Much Music in North America) and take them over for a few hours at a time with what he called Al TV.

But today, there’s no real music channels left on TV as people have switched their focus to watching more and more things online. Especially music videos. So, in true fashion of understanding his audience and today’s youth, Al took things online as well.

Weird Al teamed up with some of the most trafficked websites that show videos, with a focus on sites that show humour videos, and released a video a day across these networks. Some of the websites that Al enlisted for help include popular humour video sites like Funny Or Die and College Humour, but also video networks with a bit more of a spread than just funny videos like Yahoo! Screen,  Nerdist and even the Wall Street Journal.

By doing this, not only did Weird Al get to promote himself across a wide variety of channels that could offer him different kinds of exposure, but each website where he released his videos promoted Al as well by being able to say “this video is exclusive to our site.”

Then, to tie all of the sites and work together, Weird Al promoted the whole thing with the hashtag #8videos8days so that those that were interested just needed to search for that hashtag to find where the video of the day was being posted.

The whole thing was rather genius.

So, how did the whole thing work out? We took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to quickly check.

A search for mentions of Weird Al or his Twitter handle @alyankovic over the 8 days of his promo (July 14-21) show that he was mentioned in over 287,000 social conversations. We found Weird Al being talked about in 3,301 blog posts, 3,513 online news articles, 26,621 forum postings and 254,008 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Now, these aren’t the same numbers as you’d see when Beyonce releases an album, but they’re still quite impressive for an artist who falls into a very niche category.

The idea was to get people interested in Weird Al again, and it seemed to work. On top of all those mentions he received over those 8 days, it was also impressive to see the interest rise around the world. Below is a geo-location heat map that shows where tweets about Weird Al were coming from, and they were coming from everywhere.

Sysomos MAP - Geo-Location Heat Map of Tweets

Weird Al has always seemed to be a master of promoting himself and we think that he’s brought that mastery into the digital age for his latest album.

What can you learn from him? Know where your audience spends their time online. Learn to diversify and don’t spend all your energy on one channel when you can cover many that actually make sense to target. And most importantly, do something interesting that will grab your audience’s attention.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

And, if you want to see all 8 of Weird Al’s new videos you can view them on his official webiste, but here’s our personal favourite in which he parodies Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines to call out how people butcher the English language (which we run into a lot as we spend a great deal of time in social media and it drives some of us crazy):

Derek Jeter Eclipses The MLB All Star Game

RE2PECTOn Tuesday night Major League Baseball’s best of the best gathered in Minnesota for the annual All Star Game. This event is a highlight for all baseball fans every year as they get to watch all of their favourite players play together for one night only.

This year though had a bit of an extra special element to it. This year was Derek Jeter’s last time to appear in the All Star Game as the very well known and soon-to-be hall-of-famer will be retiring from the game at the end of this season. And while the game itself was a great one to watch, Jeter’s last appearance seemed to be the focus of everyone watching.

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, we were interested in looking into how the All Star Game resonated in social media. When we looked up direct mentions of the All Star Game or their official hashtag, #ASG we found nearly half a million mentions of the game on Tuesday. These mentions consisted of 677 blog posts, 544 online news articles, 2,166 forum postings and 495,468 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

As we started to dig a bit deeper into the actual conversations happening in social media that contained mentions of the All Star Game, we started to see a trend. Looking at our buzzgraph of conversations across all channels, we found that Derek Jeter’s name seemed to have the strongest links to almost all points of conversations around the All Star Game.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

We then looked at some of the most retweeted tweets that came from conversations around the game. Of the top 5 most retweeted tweets about the All Star Game every single one made mention of Derek Jeter.

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

The trend continued when we looked at the top hashtags also being used when people were tweeting about the All Star Game. Of the top 10 hashtags being used, 5 of them were in reference to Jeter; #Yankees (Jeter’s team for his 20 year career), #DerekJeter, #Jeter, #RE2PECT (which is from a Nike’s Jordan brand commercial paying homage to Jeter) and #FarewellCaptain (because Jeter is the Captain of the Yankees and arguably the whole MLB).

Sysomos MAP - Top Twitter Hashtags

Even on Instagram, Derek Jeter seemed to be the focal point of the All Star Game. A search for the #ASG hashtag being used on Instagram came up with 105,331 photos, and if you look at the sample of photos below you can see that most of them also seemed to focus on Jeter.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

After seeing all of this, we decided to look into just how much talk on Tuesday actually focused on Derek Jeter. So, we plugged his name and all of the hashtags mentioned above (minus the #Yankees one) into MAP and found something incredibly interesting. Mentions of Jeter on Tuesday totalled over 690,000. 906 blog posts, 2,390 online news articles, 1,417 forum postings and 686,132 tweets all made mention of Jeter. Those numbers eclipse mentions of the actual All Star Game by almost 200,000.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Do you think that the MLB veteran deserved all this attention? Did he steal the thunder of the rest of the All Star Game and the other players involved? We want to know what you think in the comments.

And finally, just because we do love and respect the man, here’s the Nike Jordan’s RE2PECT commercial (which is also just a fantastic tribute to a legend). Enjoy.

 

Which Hashflags Waved Highest During The World Cup?

After a super exciting 32 days, the World Cup is finally over.

Not only was the game play throughout the tournament exciting, with 171 goals scored to tie for the most goals scored during a World Cup, but the social activity around the event was a whole event itself to try and keep up with.

One of the cool things that was abundant in the social media world during the World Cup was Twitter allowing users to display “hashflags” for the countries they were supporting. Launched just a days before the tournament started, Twitter allowed users to display country flags right in their tweets by simply typing in a # with the three-letter country code beside it.

List of all Hashflags from Bleacher Report

We thought that the hashflags were a genius way for both Twitter to get a little more involved in the World Cup (past the tremendous amounts of real-time talk during the matches) and for fans to show their support for the team they were cheering on. But how much were these hashflags used?

We took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to find out just how many times each hashflag was raised. We plugged in the hashflag hashtags and searched over the 32 days of the World Cup to find out.

What we found was actually quite interesting. As it turns out, how a team actually performed during the World Cup didn’t always correlate to how often their hashflag was used.

While Germany took home the World Cup, their hashflag was actually beat out by Argentina’s who came in second in the tournament. This may not be so surprising after seeing our post last week that showed Germany wasn’t getting as much support in social media from their homeland as Argentina was going into the finals.

The United States also showed great pride for their team during the tournament with their hashflag being the fourth most used of the 32 teams, beating out the Netherlands who actually placed third in the tournament.

For the full counts of each hashflag, see the chart below:

Total Counts For Country Hashflags Over 32 Days of World Cup Play

We also put all of the hashflag count numbers into a pie chart so that you could visually see the difference in the share of voice each country’s hashflag garnered throughout the World Cup.

Share of Voice for All World Cup Hashflags

We also thought it would be interesting to look at how each of the hashflags was used over time. It’s no surprise here to see that each country’s hashflag would spike in usage on days when they played a match. Below is a chart of all 32 team’s hashflag usage spread out over the 32 days of the world cup. Unfortunately, 32 teams in one chart makes it incredibly hard to read, so below that we’ve also broken down the charts to only include 8 teams, or 2 groups from the original group play round, at a time.

Popularity Chart of All World Cup Hashflags

Popularity of hashflags for Groups A & B

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups A & B

Popularity of hashflags for Groups C & D

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups C & D

Popularity of hashflags for Groups E & F

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups E & F

Popularity of hashflags for Groups G & H

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups G & H

Lastly, we hope that you were keeping an eye on our Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker during the tournament. This dashboard was used to visually show where mentions of the official #WorldCup hashtag were coming from. In addition to showing where the hashtag was actually being used over the course of the tournament, we were also keeping a running tally of which countries were using the official hashtag the most. Now the the World Cup is over, we have the final tally and without further ado, here’s the top 10 countries that used the #WorldCup hashtag over 32 days of play:

Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker - Top 10 Countries

We’re curious if any of these numbers above surprise you? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

World Cup Finals: How Argentina and Germany Look in Social Media

World Cup 2014As of yesterday evening (in our local time zone) we now know that after 28 days of World Cup fever the entire world will be watching Argentina and Germany play in the finals.

This year’s World Cup has a been a very exciting one. Both in terms of the matches played and also the social media activity that has been going on during the tournament. This World Cup has seen a flurry of social media activity from fans cheering on their team to some incredible memes based on events during the tournament.

But what has the social activity around our two final teams looked like? That’s what we wanted to find out as we get set for the final match this weekend. So, we took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to explore the mentions of Germany and Argentina.

The first thing we did for this quick analysis was to look at number of mentions of each team from the start of the World Cup (on June 12) up until yesterday. Here we found that Argentina has a greater share of voice across social media channels beating out Germany 61% to 39%. However, neither team seems to be lacking in mentions as Germany amassed 22,680,311 mentions in those 28 days, while Argentina saw 35,378,525 mentions.

Sysomos MAP - Share of Voice Comparison

Where all of those mentions were coming from is the interesting part though. When we broke down those mentions of each team by source, we found something very interesting. When both Germany and Argentina were being talked about in blogs and in online news articles, the two seemed quite even. In both blog posts and online news articles the split was 51% to 49% with Argentina getting just a few more mentions than Germany. Then, when we look at forum postings, we find that Germany mentions bested Argentina by almost 150,000 mentions. However, when it then came to Twitter (which is the leading social network for real-time World Cup chatter), Argentina saw almost 13 million more mentions than Germany did.

Sysomos MAP - Share of Voice Comparison by Source

The difference in Twitter mentions seems quite staggering at first, but then we found something interesting. We took a look at where mentions of each team were originating from across all channels.  When we looked at the mentions of Argentina we found that the country making the most noise was (not surprisingly) Argentina. Almost a quarter of all Argentina mentions came from their own country who has been showing their support throughout the World Cup.

Sysomos MAP - Breakdown of Mentions by Country

But then when we looked at where mentions of Germany were originating from, we found that most of them weren’t coming from Germany. In fact, Germany doesn’t seem to be that active in supporting their team… at least through social media. Germany actually came in 4th in terms of mention of their own country behind the USA, UK and Spain. That lack in social support from their own country can help explain the huge difference in mentions of each country.

Sysomos MAP - Breakdown of Mentions by Country

Some may argue though that it’s not the number of mentions that a team gets, but rather the intention behind those mentions. To understand the intentions behind those mentions we looked at the sentiment around each team. According to industry leading sentiment analysis engine Argentina has seen a 80% favourable rating during the World Cup. 22% of all mentions about Argentina have been positive, while 20% have been negative.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

While Germany hasn’t seen as many social mentions during the World Cup as Argentina, they do have a much better favourable rating, coming in at 81%. While their favourable rating comes in just 1% higher than Argentina, the details show that they actually seem to have a larger percentage of their mentions being positive. Germany has seen 27% of all their mentions being positive and only 19% negative. So, just because they aren’t being talked about as much, it doesn’t necessarily mean they are worse off than their final rivals in any way.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

One last interesting chart we want to share with you is our popularity chart, which shows the mentions of each team spread out over the time of the World Cup so far. We just found this one interesting because you can actually see what days each team played on just by looking at how their mentions spike on game days. Take a look:

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Comparison Chart

So who do you think is going to win the World Cup this year? Argentina or Germany? The team with the most social mentions or the team with the most positive sentiment? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

And, for some more World Cup social media fun, be sure to check out our Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker which is showing off where tweets containing the official #WorldCup hashtag are originating from in real-time.

Sysomos MAP and Heartbeat Updates: Tumblr, YouTube and Facebook

Let’s just say we’ve been busy. Very, very busy. 

At Sysomos, we’re always working behind the scenes to make our technology better. Whether it’s delivering greater speed and accuracy, or more data and more potent analytics, our ongoing mission is to provide you with the best social intelligence out there — so that you can make the kinds of business decisions that drive future success. With that in mind, we’d like to share some of the major enhancements we’ve made lately, including the addition of Tumblr to our ever-expanding data set.

We’ve put Tumblr on the MAP. 

Earlier this year we announced our partnership with Tumblr. Today we’re thrilled to announce our all-new Tumblr integration, which gives you the ability to glean insights from the full breadth of Tumblr’s data, has been added to MAP. In fact, you can search for mentions using text-based queries among all eight Tumblr data types — from photos, text, audio and video, to quotes, answers, links and chats. And you can evaluate those mentions using Overall Sentiment, Word Cloud and Buzzgraph analytics. Perhaps best of all, you can get started right now.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Search Results

Sysomos MAP - View Tumblr Posts

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Buzzgraph

 

You’ll love (not just ‘Like’) more Facebook results in MAP.

Enter search terms as usual and you’ll notice something right away: a lot more Facebook results. Why? We’re now pulling in tons more Facebook data. More data = more results. And that’s the kind of math everyone loves to do.

Run YouTube Analytics without skipping a Heartbeat.

You can now view no less than 17 of the most popular YouTube Channel metrics — including Geographical, Playback, Traffic Sources and Device, as well as Basic and Daily metrics — right from within the Heartbeat platform, without having to log in to YouTube.  All that’s required is a one-time permissions process in which your YouTube Channel administrator (maybe that’s even you) grants Heartbeat access to retrieve the metrics. Here’s a sample of how some of these new metrics will look in your Heartbeat:

Sysomos Heartbeat - YouTube Views

Sysomos Heartbeat - Youtube View Duration By Country

Sysomos Heartbeat - Youtube View Duration by Device

 

As always, if you’re already using MAP or Heartbeat please contact your account team with any questions.

If you’re not already using MAP or Heartbeat, please feel free to contact us to learn more about these great new updates and our software overall.

Five Key Takeaways From San Francisco

Today’s post was written by our CEO, Jim Delaney

Social And The Customer Intimacy Imperative

The other week’s Social and the Customer Intimacy Imperative event (#SysomosCII) was a resounding success for the Sysomos team. We brought together some of the brightest minds and biggest brands, and cultivated an outstanding discussion about the next frontier of social: the intersection of data, predictive analytics and revolutionary customer experiences. I cannot thank our speakers and attendees enough for such an inspiring conversation.

The Customer Intimacy Imperative is an age-old problem, but the solution is a moving target that continues to shift as technology advances and culture evolve. The sheer amount of raw data available through social networks means that brands, large and small, MUST engage through social channels or risk devastating consequences of irrelevance and ineptness.

Whenever I’m in the company of other leaders at industry events — either as a host or a participant — I’m always amazed by how much I learn. While I could go on for days about all the kernels of wisdom that were shared last Tuesday, I’ve whittled my list down to five key takeaways from #SysomosCII:

1)     Look forward, not backward: No longer is it enough to look back to see what happened and why it happened. Customers want brands to anticipate their needs. The social web is a focus group of hundreds of millions providing insightful data that brands can use to anticipate future needs.

2)     LOTS of data: Too much data perhaps. Social is pervading the marketing team into other reaches of business. The data is driving new business models as innovative brands are leveraging social data in the decision making process. (@RMB, @chuckhemann, @znh)

3)     Analysis gap: Either in talent or technology, brands need to better understand the “social cocktail” globally in terms of differences between cultures and market segments. The skews of relevance are paramount to help determine ROI. (@RMB, @chuckhemann, @znh)

4)     Be able to take a punch: Social data is disruptive to traditional marketing. Expect questions. (@MasonNelder)

5)     Audience is a privilege: The fundamentals of marketing still apply today. We want customers to trust us and communicate with us. Respecting the customer-brand relationship will foster loyalty, and loyalty will drive revenue… ROI! (@petershankman, @jbmustin)

These takeaways barely scratch the surface of what the future of marketing might look like. But you can be sure that we’re going to see some amazing new developments in the coming months that will define that future. In the meantime, stay tuned as we continue to share insights from #SysomosCII.