Posts Tagged ‘community management’

How Audible Uses Social Intelligence Powered By Sysomos

Audible needs no introduction. The company is one of the pioneers on the web, having brought audiobooks to the connected, tech-savvy consumer. The service has a loyal fanbase of customers ranging from the very young to those who’d classify their age as ‘mature’. :)

Audible is a global brand, stretching across North America, Europe and all the way to Australia.

The social team at Audible is a small group that has a large impact. In order to help service the various departments at Audible, the team uses Sysomos to make smart decisions based on social intelligence.

Helping product marketing decide upon priorities

As Audible customers ourselves, we realize that the best audiobooks are a combination of a fantastic book and of course, a stellar narrator. In fact, when you find a narrator you like, you often seek out books brought to life by those immense talents.

It turns out we’re not alone and Audible realizes this. Using Sysomos Heartbeat, the marketing team tracks top narrators based on conversations occurring on the social web. Then, using MAP queries to dig deeper, product marketing is made aware of top narrators and given context of the voice talent is one who’s sought after.

In the same manner of Heartbeat monitoring and ad hoc MAP queries, the social team reports on authors, narrators, plot lines and other social data to help formulate a predictive formula for a top seller in the Audible store.

Informing Customer Care and Community Management

In our interview with Audible’s marketing team, community management and customer care were recurring themes that make use of Sysomos technologies. As a team that’s spread across geographies, Sysomos Heartbeats and MAP searches unify efforts and leads to time efficiencies that wouldn’t otherwise be possible.

“Instead of just monitoring direct mentions, we have Heartbeats that help us monitor all aspects of customer satisfaction,” says Monica Vaccari, community manager at Audible.  “From identifying issues with books, to pinpointing potential bugs in our mobile apps, Sysomos helps puts hours back in our day.”

To communicate what categories of questions and issues the Audible social team replies to, they’ve employed tags in Sysomos Heartbeat. After a response is issued to the customer via Sysomos Heartbeat, they use the tagging system to tag each contact with a relevant category.

Social Care Responses

In their rock-star efforts to ensure customer happiness, Audible makes use of Sysomos Heartbeat, MAP and publishing tools.

“Through Sysomos, we can find buried conversations that we wouldn’t be able to find on our own.”

Using Sysomos Text Analytics, the social care team reports on what words and phrases are being used and responded through on social media. This helps the team illustrate that time period’s conversation topics in relation to Audible’s key words.

Text Analytics

Applied example: going above and beyond for the community

Recently, the Audible social care team noticed a notable influx of inbound messages surrounding the a popular podcast and Audible. At first glance, the team thought it was a crisis of some kind, but upon further investigation, the podcast creators, in their show, urged listeners to Tweet at Audible in an effort to get an audiobook recorded.

The social team went in to action and helped the show’s producer through the audiobook production process and in a short period of time, Audible had the audiobook up for sale.

This process is a successful example of community managers identifying a want, helping the customer through an otherwise involved process and delivering a finished product to the marketplace.

What a great way to honor a content request and enable these content producers find a market for their creations!

Influencer engagement

One marketing outreach area that Audible is seeing a boost in is YouTube personalities. Through affiliate marketing, YouTubers are driving links and sign-ups at Audible.com and through the Sysomos lens, Audible knows which YouTube creators are the most valuable to their brand.

In a similar vein, if you’re a podcast fan, then you’ve likely heard your favorite podcast host mention Audible.com as a sponsor.

Audible learned early on when podcasting started as a medium that listeners of top podcasts were the perfect candidates to trial Audible and convert to customer. Similar to finding YouTuber influencers, Audible uses Sysomos to recruit and track podcasters in their affiliate marketing programs.

Merchandising using social intelligence

For any retail business, knowing what goods and products to highlight is an art that is sometimes informed by science. This is where social intelligence comes in to play. By using social insights, Audible merchandising teams can listen, experiment and feature titles at will.

On a regular basis, the community management team sends reports and observations to the Content team at Audible (the group who acquires new titles). From data on new prospective authors, narrators and even potential titles, the Community team has 6 MAP reports that went over Comic books, podcasts and other new types of content.

As a result, Audible acquired the rights to those titles and they’ll be in the store this summer.

Applied example: One Direction

In 2014, the wildly popular group One Direction released a memoir of their lives as artists.  As an added bonus, the band members each narrated their parts within the audiobook. Noticing a spike in conversation on social, the Community team at Audible was the first to pick up on Audible customers’ interest in this title. The team was astonished at how focused and passionate One Directions’ fans were and notified the Audible product team.

Audible was able to put the book up for pre-order and with their learnings, the social team informed those in charge of paid social advertising. Those ads drove new member acquisition and the One Direction narrated book even made the Audible.com home page based off the interest first spotted on social media.

Launching a dedicated social care channel

In order to better serve their customers, Audible is launching a Twitter account dedicated to customer care. To help coordinate between the main Audible account and Audible social care channels, the teams will use assigned tweets inside Sysomos to coordinate responses and set assignments.

Also, with an added team member, Sysomos makes it possible to orchestrate efforts regardless of a person’s office location.

Audible.com has sister sites in Australia, Germany, France and the UK, the community team has adheres to a unified social approach through regular meeting and weekly email coordination with the social care teams.

Being able to have social care reporting will be an added benefit to launching an Audible Social Care Twitter handle. Social Care and Audible Customer Care both align in one mission: “Exceed Expectations.” As Audible matures along the social care timeline, they seek to keep exceeding expectations.

In the graph below, the Social Care Team reports on the favorable sentiment of the contacts social care responds to.

Social Care Sentiment

Social Intelligence’s place in your community management practice

How do you integrate intelligence as a community manager? Which any of the lessons learned form the Audible team resonate with you?

Is your reporting different and better? Leave a comment below and let’s discuss!

3 Ways To Use Social Intelligence To Grow Your Community

Grow Your CommunityYou’ve spent a lot time and effort growing your online community to get where you’re at today. You have a great group of people who are interested in interacting and championing your brand, but it’s not quite enough.

The great thing about online communities is that they’re living organisms. They’re always changing and, maybe more importantly, always have the chance to grow.

But how do you help your community grow even more than you already have? You feel like you’ve already done your monitoring to find out where your audience was and then started to engage with them there and they responded. Well, there’s a good chance that since the last time you did your research the landscape has changed yet again and there are a ton of new opportunities out there for you to grow your community even more.

Here’s a few tips that will help you use social intelligence to further grow your community:

Find where people are talking (again)

In today’s online world there are always new places and sites where people are going to learn and have conversations about your brand or topics that relate heavily to your brand. Using a social intelligence tool, like Sysomos, can can help you to identify what networks to start looking at. Start by entering a search for your brand name or some key industry terms and then look at where these conversations are happening most. Are there a lot of blog posts that come up in your search? Maybe there’s a ton of Twitter conversations. Heck, maybe people are sharing a lot of pictures related to your brand on Instagram. Find where the action is and then you can dive in deeper to get a better look at you can fit in there with them.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Activity Chart

Determine the real hotspots of activity for your community

You’ve found some of the networks and channels that you think could have a great potential for bringing people into your community. Now it’s time to get more granular to find the best new places and people to focus your efforts on.

While everyone in your community should be treated as an equal, there may be some people and sites that deserve a little extra attention to help bring more people into your community. A social intelligence tool can help you to identify these sites and people. For example, using Sysomos’s Most Authoritative tool can help you determine the blogs or people with the highest authority score that are talking about your brand or your search terms. Are these people or places you frequently interact with? If they’re not, they should be. These are the people and sites that are generally leading conversations and have people listening to them when they do so. Interacting with these people can help them to become more aware of you and your great community. The more you interact with them the more they’re likely to want to get involved with you and likely bring others with them. It’s important to keep seeking these people out on a regular basis as this list is going to constantly change as new voices enter the picture and older ones fade out.

Sysomos MAP - Most Authoritative Twitter Accounts That Tweet About Running Clubs

But people and sites with high authority aren’t the only people that you should focus your attention on. There are plenty of people out there that may be super fans of your brand or highly interested in your space and talking about it that aren’t necessarily your typical “influencer”. That’s why our Sysomos tools also have features to help you identify the people and places that are talking most about your brand or other key terms regardless of their authority. Looking for people and places with the most mentions of your interest can be helpful because while they may not have the reach of some of those people with a higher authority score than them, they’re still talking to people who are interested in the same subjects as them. These are the people that are truly interested and can easily be brought into your community and help to champion it to their own communities.

Sysomos MAP - Top Sources That Tweet Most About Cooking

Learn what your community values and give them lots of it

As a community manager myself for the past 5 years, if there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s that communities thrive when they find value coming from within that community. Saying that you’ve created a community is very different than having an actual community. People get the feeling of actually being part of a community when they’re able to both give and take in a valuable way. So how do you learn what your community actually values (besides your brand, of course)?

Start by learning more about them and their interests. For example, below is a word cloud made up of the bio’s of Sysomos’s Twitter followers. Twitter bios are a great place to start because people volunteer information about themselves including what they do and what they like. As you can see in the word cloud we obviously have a large group of folks following us that are marketers, communicators and people that are into the digital world. But if we look closer we can also see that these people identify as being fans of sports, music and more regardless of what they do for their day job. This let us know that our current community members have interests beyond social media, so we find ways to insert these other topics into what we do around social media. That’s why on our blog you’ll occasionally see posts where we talk about how social media played a role during other pop culture related events, like The Grammys or The Super Bowl, because we know that our audience likes these things and we’re able to find a way to show them something of value that also relates back to our brand and what we do.

Sysomos MAP - Word Cloud of  @Sysomos' s Twitter Followers' bios

But people also reveal a lot about what they value through what they talk about. So, find out what they talk about most and see if your brand can fit in to some of those things as well. Start looking at what some of your most active community members are interested in and try to figure out ways that you can help them or add value to these things. One step further would be to create a media set inside of Sysomos of your most active community members and then look at text analytics around what they all talk about and see what surfaces. Seeing what a large group talks about in common will give you a great idea of what your larger community is interested in. You can then create content that fits with your brand around those topics and even interact directly with your community members around them.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph of Social Media Influencers' Conversations

If you start making your community feel like they’re really getting something from you, they will also start to share those valuable pieces of content and others will be brought into the community by seeing the value they can get from it.

The ideas above are just a few ways that can get you started on using social intelligence to keep your community growing. Remember that communities are going to constantly keep growing, so keep going back and doing these things time and time again to help your community grow.

We’re also curious to know how you’re using social intelligence to grow your communities. Let us know in the comments below.

Do you need social intelligence to grow your community? Give us a shout to find out how we can help you with it.

Community Manager Appreciation Day (#CMAD) 2015 Social Media Summary Report

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Community Manager Appreciation Day Tweets

Did you hug a community manager on Monday? Even virtually?

If you did, you weren’t alone.

This Monday was the 5th annual Community Manager Appreciation Day. A day to celebrate the tireless people that work hard (probably harder than you think) to make sure that their brand’s communities and audiences are constantly informed, entertained and engaged. And celebrated they were.

We had the fine folks on the Sysomos Reports team take a look at the social media activity around Community Manager Appreciation Day and wanted to share their results with you.

Some of the highlights you’ll see in the report include:

  • Community Manager Appreciation Day and the #CMAD hashtag were used over 18,000 times
  • Over 17,000 of those mentions came from Twitter
  • All of those tweets had an potential reach of 154 million eyeballs
  • Community Manager Appreciation Day was celebrated across all 7 continents
  • And this was the most retweeted tweet about Community Manager Appreciation Day:

 

 

Check out the whole report for yourself here:

We want to hear about your Community Manager Appreciation Day in the comments. Did you thank a community manager for their hard work? Who was it? Are you a community manager that got an awesome surprise on Monday? What was it? Let us know below.
BONUS: I took part in the 24 hours of community management panels that happened on Community Manager Appreciation Day with a panel on “community management services,” and if you missed it (because it was at 5amEST) you can see the recording on the My Community Manager YouTube page.

Happy Community Manager Appreciation Day! #CMAD

Community Manager Appreciation Day

Today is Community Manager Appreciation Day, a day to thank the many community managers out there that work tirelessly (and sometimes at insane hours) to make sure that brands and their audiences are always getting the best experiences possible.

Over the past few years the role of a community manager has become more prominent as more and more companies see the value in having one. However, what’s interesting about the role is how it’s defined differently for every company that has one.

In pretty much every organization the day-to-day activities of a community manager will vary, but one thing will always remain constant; the community manager is a connection between a company and their audience. They act to help both the inside and the outside of their organizations and usually have a great handle on what’s going on on both sides of the fence.

This is so important in our modern world where everyone with an internet connection has a voice. Someone needs to listen to all of those voices and make sure they’re being heard. This means relaying what’s going on in the world to people inside their organization as well as letting their external audience know what’s happening inside the organization.

The community manager is sometimes overlooked as just the person that “plays on Twitter all day.” But this is hardly true. A community manager needs to be a wealth of information with their finger always on the pulse of pretty much everything going on in the world and find ways to relate that information to further the happiness of their many communities (the internal and external ones).

There’s also many ways that people can go about performing community management. Below is a presentation that I gave to open CM1, a community manager focused conference in Toronto, about a year ago. Inside you’ll find a few ways to look at how you can go about managing your community and I also give some insight into how I go about being a community manager.

So, if you work for a company that has a community manager or if you know one out there in the world, let them know you appreciate them today. Presents are always welcome, but even a heartfelt “thank you” will surely warm their heart.

To all my fellow community managers out there, thank you for being awesome and furthering our profession. On behalf of the entire Sysomos team, we salute you all.

Insights From A Day Of Learning About Community Management

Last week we put up a post that noted that I was attending CM1, a conference for community managers to share and learn from one another. In that post I shared some resources that I thought community managers would find useful and tried to kick off a conversation that other community managers could join in on.

Community

As well, in that post I promised that I would share some of the key insights that I took away from that conference.

True to my word, today I wanted to share a Storify that I put together during that conference.

Below you will find some of the best and insightful tweets that I took from the audience at CM1 during most of the day’s presentations. The Storify is a bit long as I combined the whole day into one story, but if you’re a brand that is focused on engaging with your audience or a community manager looking for some ideas and inspiration, it will definitely be worth the read.

Read the Storify from CM1 below and leave us a comment to let us know what you think about some of the ideas presented or share with us some of your best community management tips.

As well, if you’d like to see the slides from most of the presentations for yourself, you can find them here.

Sharing Resources To Grow The Role Of The Community Manager

Today I’m at CM1, a conference for community managers, taking place in Toronto.

Just think that 10 years ago there was no role at a company called a community manager. Today though, many companies have community managers (or sometimes they call them social media managers) and we have whole conferences set up around learning and growing for people who do this.

I did a quick search for the terms “community manager” and “community management” over the past year using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, and found that they were mentioned in 1.1 million social conversations. If that isn’t proof that this is an important role, I’m not sure what is.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

But what is a community manager?

A lot of people still see this role as “the person who plays on social media all day.” While a lot of community management is done via social media because of the access that the social web has opened to people, that’s not really a great definition for what community managers do.

My personal definition of a community manager is that they are the person (or people, depending on the size of your organization) that act as the bridge between the people inside your company and your customers, community, fans and friends outside of your company. A community manager should be the person in your organization that has their pulse on what’s going on on with your community and can relate that information to the people that need it inside your company. At the same time, they need to be informed about what’s happening inside your company so they can share that information with people outside that are interested. The community manager needs to be fully immersed in everything that is going on.

Now, that’s just my definition of what I think a community manager should be. Every company will define this a little bit differently, but it should seem somewhat like what I said above. But your company and you have to decide how you will approach community management yourself.

I had the pleasure of being the opening speaker at CM1 the last time the conference was in town and I put together a presentation that can help you decide what kind of community manager your company needs and how you will do it. Here’s my slides for you to look over yourself (they’re better with me speaking over them, but you’ll get the point):

As a community manager myself, I feel it’s important for community managers to talk and grow the role together. That’s why I’ll be taking notes and putting together a Storify of some of the great content I’ll be learning today about community management and will share it here on the blog next week.

In the meantime though, here’s a few more resources that I like to learn more about community management:

  • Community Manager Chat – This is a weekly Twitter chat that happens every Wednesday at 2pm(EST) where community managers gather to discuss tips and best practices around a different community related topics every week. To join the chat, keep an eye out for and use the hashtag #cmgrchat on Twitter.
  • The Community Manager – The Community Manager is a website dedicated to all things community management. There’s a lot of great articles on this site around brand communities, so check them out at http://thecommunitymanager.com/
  • The Community Roundtable – The Community Roundtable is a members only group where professionals focused on growing communities for their brands can interact with each other to trade stories, ideas and more. While this group may have a member fee, it may be worth it as there’s a lot of great brands and professionals you can learn from that already members. Check the group out at http://www.communityroundtable.com/

That’s just a few good resources I know of. What are some good resources for community management you use or know about? Please share with us in the comments.

Happy Community Manager Appreciation Day! We Come Bearing Gifts

Happy Community Manager Appreciation Day!

What’s this, you ask? Well, Community Manager Appreciation Day (CMAD) was created back in 2010 by Jeremiah Owyang to celebrate the tireless efforts of community managers around the world. Community managers spend their day acting as a bridge between their company or brand and the world at large. At any given time you can find a community manager acting as the PR, marketing, sales, customer service and voice of a brand all at the same time. Today is the day we give them thanks.

Does your company have a community manager? Have you had a great experience from a brand thanks to their community manager? Today’s their day, so thank them for the wonderful job that they’re doing. Presents aren’t required (although I’m sure they also wouldn’t be turned away), but your thanks and appreciation is welcome.

Now, when I said that presents aren’t required, I meant it, but we have two for all the community managers out there anyways.

First, we have the ebook “A Collection Of Community Management Advice.” We teamed up with TheCommunityManager.com and issued an open survey of seven questions to community managers around the world. We got some great responses and put them together for anyone that’s interested in learning what it takes to be a successful community manager. Inside, you can find advice from community managers from EventBrite, Sony Computer Entertainment America, Syracuse University, Edelman, The Community Roundtable, The U.S. Department of State and more.

You can click here to download and keep A Collection Of Community Management Advice.

Our second present is also packed with useful advice for community managers, but comes in the form of a video. We had a few friends at New Media Expo a few weeks ago answer a couple of community management questions. We asked some social media professionals “What makes a great community manager?” and who some of their favourite community managers were. Check out their answers:

So to all those community managers out there making their companies better 24/7, we say thank you!