Posts Tagged ‘MAP’

Weird Al Knows How To Stay Relevant In The Digital Age

weird-al-mandatory-funIn a world where everyone is competing for attention via whatever screen happens to be in front of your eyes at the time, it may not always be that easy to get people to pay attention. Add to that, being a musical genius, but to a relatively niche audience, that’s been in the game for over 30 years. How do you get people to pay attention?

Well, if you’re Weird Al Yankovic, you go on a musical marathon across the web.

Last Tuesday, Weird Al, the king of the parody song, released his latest album entitled Mandatory Fun. But rather than let the record companies release one song as a single and handle the promotion, Al took matters into his own hands to make sure that his new songs spread across people’s computer screens.

Weird Al did a promo for his latest album by releasing a music video a day for songs from the album that was aptly called #8videos8days. Every day for 8 days a new Weird Al music video appeared online, but always in a different place, which really added to the genius of this promotion.

Weird Al is no stranger to stirring up attention when he has a new album release. Dating all the back to 1984, Weird Al would go on TV stations that played music videos (back then being MTV and Much Music in North America) and take them over for a few hours at a time with what he called Al TV.

But today, there’s no real music channels left on TV as people have switched their focus to watching more and more things online. Especially music videos. So, in true fashion of understanding his audience and today’s youth, Al took things online as well.

Weird Al teamed up with some of the most trafficked websites that show videos, with a focus on sites that show humour videos, and released a video a day across these networks. Some of the websites that Al enlisted for help include popular humour video sites like Funny Or Die and College Humour, but also video networks with a bit more of a spread than just funny videos like Yahoo! Screen,  Nerdist and even the Wall Street Journal.

By doing this, not only did Weird Al get to promote himself across a wide variety of channels that could offer him different kinds of exposure, but each website where he released his videos promoted Al as well by being able to say “this video is exclusive to our site.”

Then, to tie all of the sites and work together, Weird Al promoted the whole thing with the hashtag #8videos8days so that those that were interested just needed to search for that hashtag to find where the video of the day was being posted.

The whole thing was rather genius.

So, how did the whole thing work out? We took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to quickly check.

A search for mentions of Weird Al or his Twitter handle @alyankovic over the 8 days of his promo (July 14-21) show that he was mentioned in over 287,000 social conversations. We found Weird Al being talked about in 3,301 blog posts, 3,513 online news articles, 26,621 forum postings and 254,008 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Now, these aren’t the same numbers as you’d see when Beyonce releases an album, but they’re still quite impressive for an artist who falls into a very niche category.

The idea was to get people interested in Weird Al again, and it seemed to work. On top of all those mentions he received over those 8 days, it was also impressive to see the interest rise around the world. Below is a geo-location heat map that shows where tweets about Weird Al were coming from, and they were coming from everywhere.

Sysomos MAP - Geo-Location Heat Map of Tweets

Weird Al has always seemed to be a master of promoting himself and we think that he’s brought that mastery into the digital age for his latest album.

What can you learn from him? Know where your audience spends their time online. Learn to diversify and don’t spend all your energy on one channel when you can cover many that actually make sense to target. And most importantly, do something interesting that will grab your audience’s attention.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

And, if you want to see all 8 of Weird Al’s new videos you can view them on his official webiste, but here’s our personal favourite in which he parodies Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines to call out how people butcher the English language (which we run into a lot as we spend a great deal of time in social media and it drives some of us crazy):

Derek Jeter Eclipses The MLB All Star Game

RE2PECTOn Tuesday night Major League Baseball’s best of the best gathered in Minnesota for the annual All Star Game. This event is a highlight for all baseball fans every year as they get to watch all of their favourite players play together for one night only.

This year though had a bit of an extra special element to it. This year was Derek Jeter’s last time to appear in the All Star Game as the very well known and soon-to-be hall-of-famer will be retiring from the game at the end of this season. And while the game itself was a great one to watch, Jeter’s last appearance seemed to be the focus of everyone watching.

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, we were interested in looking into how the All Star Game resonated in social media. When we looked up direct mentions of the All Star Game or their official hashtag, #ASG we found nearly half a million mentions of the game on Tuesday. These mentions consisted of 677 blog posts, 544 online news articles, 2,166 forum postings and 495,468 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

As we started to dig a bit deeper into the actual conversations happening in social media that contained mentions of the All Star Game, we started to see a trend. Looking at our buzzgraph of conversations across all channels, we found that Derek Jeter’s name seemed to have the strongest links to almost all points of conversations around the All Star Game.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

We then looked at some of the most retweeted tweets that came from conversations around the game. Of the top 5 most retweeted tweets about the All Star Game every single one made mention of Derek Jeter.

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

The trend continued when we looked at the top hashtags also being used when people were tweeting about the All Star Game. Of the top 10 hashtags being used, 5 of them were in reference to Jeter; #Yankees (Jeter’s team for his 20 year career), #DerekJeter, #Jeter, #RE2PECT (which is from a Nike’s Jordan brand commercial paying homage to Jeter) and #FarewellCaptain (because Jeter is the Captain of the Yankees and arguably the whole MLB).

Sysomos MAP - Top Twitter Hashtags

Even on Instagram, Derek Jeter seemed to be the focal point of the All Star Game. A search for the #ASG hashtag being used on Instagram came up with 105,331 photos, and if you look at the sample of photos below you can see that most of them also seemed to focus on Jeter.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

After seeing all of this, we decided to look into just how much talk on Tuesday actually focused on Derek Jeter. So, we plugged his name and all of the hashtags mentioned above (minus the #Yankees one) into MAP and found something incredibly interesting. Mentions of Jeter on Tuesday totalled over 690,000. 906 blog posts, 2,390 online news articles, 1,417 forum postings and 686,132 tweets all made mention of Jeter. Those numbers eclipse mentions of the actual All Star Game by almost 200,000.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Do you think that the MLB veteran deserved all this attention? Did he steal the thunder of the rest of the All Star Game and the other players involved? We want to know what you think in the comments.

And finally, just because we do love and respect the man, here’s the Nike Jordan’s RE2PECT commercial (which is also just a fantastic tribute to a legend). Enjoy.

 

Which Hashflags Waved Highest During The World Cup?

After a super exciting 32 days, the World Cup is finally over.

Not only was the game play throughout the tournament exciting, with 171 goals scored to tie for the most goals scored during a World Cup, but the social activity around the event was a whole event itself to try and keep up with.

One of the cool things that was abundant in the social media world during the World Cup was Twitter allowing users to display “hashflags” for the countries they were supporting. Launched just a days before the tournament started, Twitter allowed users to display country flags right in their tweets by simply typing in a # with the three-letter country code beside it.

List of all Hashflags from Bleacher Report

We thought that the hashflags were a genius way for both Twitter to get a little more involved in the World Cup (past the tremendous amounts of real-time talk during the matches) and for fans to show their support for the team they were cheering on. But how much were these hashflags used?

We took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to find out just how many times each hashflag was raised. We plugged in the hashflag hashtags and searched over the 32 days of the World Cup to find out.

What we found was actually quite interesting. As it turns out, how a team actually performed during the World Cup didn’t always correlate to how often their hashflag was used.

While Germany took home the World Cup, their hashflag was actually beat out by Argentina’s who came in second in the tournament. This may not be so surprising after seeing our post last week that showed Germany wasn’t getting as much support in social media from their homeland as Argentina was going into the finals.

The United States also showed great pride for their team during the tournament with their hashflag being the fourth most used of the 32 teams, beating out the Netherlands who actually placed third in the tournament.

For the full counts of each hashflag, see the chart below:

Total Counts For Country Hashflags Over 32 Days of World Cup Play

We also put all of the hashflag count numbers into a pie chart so that you could visually see the difference in the share of voice each country’s hashflag garnered throughout the World Cup.

Share of Voice for All World Cup Hashflags

We also thought it would be interesting to look at how each of the hashflags was used over time. It’s no surprise here to see that each country’s hashflag would spike in usage on days when they played a match. Below is a chart of all 32 team’s hashflag usage spread out over the 32 days of the world cup. Unfortunately, 32 teams in one chart makes it incredibly hard to read, so below that we’ve also broken down the charts to only include 8 teams, or 2 groups from the original group play round, at a time.

Popularity Chart of All World Cup Hashflags

Popularity of hashflags for Groups A & B

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups A & B

Popularity of hashflags for Groups C & D

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups C & D

Popularity of hashflags for Groups E & F

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups E & F

Popularity of hashflags for Groups G & H

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart of Hashflags from Groups G & H

Lastly, we hope that you were keeping an eye on our Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker during the tournament. This dashboard was used to visually show where mentions of the official #WorldCup hashtag were coming from. In addition to showing where the hashtag was actually being used over the course of the tournament, we were also keeping a running tally of which countries were using the official hashtag the most. Now the the World Cup is over, we have the final tally and without further ado, here’s the top 10 countries that used the #WorldCup hashtag over 32 days of play:

Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker - Top 10 Countries

We’re curious if any of these numbers above surprise you? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

World Cup Finals: How Argentina and Germany Look in Social Media

World Cup 2014As of yesterday evening (in our local time zone) we now know that after 28 days of World Cup fever the entire world will be watching Argentina and Germany play in the finals.

This year’s World Cup has a been a very exciting one. Both in terms of the matches played and also the social media activity that has been going on during the tournament. This World Cup has seen a flurry of social media activity from fans cheering on their team to some incredible memes based on events during the tournament.

But what has the social activity around our two final teams looked like? That’s what we wanted to find out as we get set for the final match this weekend. So, we took to MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to explore the mentions of Germany and Argentina.

The first thing we did for this quick analysis was to look at number of mentions of each team from the start of the World Cup (on June 12) up until yesterday. Here we found that Argentina has a greater share of voice across social media channels beating out Germany 61% to 39%. However, neither team seems to be lacking in mentions as Germany amassed 22,680,311 mentions in those 28 days, while Argentina saw 35,378,525 mentions.

Sysomos MAP - Share of Voice Comparison

Where all of those mentions were coming from is the interesting part though. When we broke down those mentions of each team by source, we found something very interesting. When both Germany and Argentina were being talked about in blogs and in online news articles, the two seemed quite even. In both blog posts and online news articles the split was 51% to 49% with Argentina getting just a few more mentions than Germany. Then, when we look at forum postings, we find that Germany mentions bested Argentina by almost 150,000 mentions. However, when it then came to Twitter (which is the leading social network for real-time World Cup chatter), Argentina saw almost 13 million more mentions than Germany did.

Sysomos MAP - Share of Voice Comparison by Source

The difference in Twitter mentions seems quite staggering at first, but then we found something interesting. We took a look at where mentions of each team were originating from across all channels.  When we looked at the mentions of Argentina we found that the country making the most noise was (not surprisingly) Argentina. Almost a quarter of all Argentina mentions came from their own country who has been showing their support throughout the World Cup.

Sysomos MAP - Breakdown of Mentions by Country

But then when we looked at where mentions of Germany were originating from, we found that most of them weren’t coming from Germany. In fact, Germany doesn’t seem to be that active in supporting their team… at least through social media. Germany actually came in 4th in terms of mention of their own country behind the USA, UK and Spain. That lack in social support from their own country can help explain the huge difference in mentions of each country.

Sysomos MAP - Breakdown of Mentions by Country

Some may argue though that it’s not the number of mentions that a team gets, but rather the intention behind those mentions. To understand the intentions behind those mentions we looked at the sentiment around each team. According to industry leading sentiment analysis engine Argentina has seen a 80% favourable rating during the World Cup. 22% of all mentions about Argentina have been positive, while 20% have been negative.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

While Germany hasn’t seen as many social mentions during the World Cup as Argentina, they do have a much better favourable rating, coming in at 81%. While their favourable rating comes in just 1% higher than Argentina, the details show that they actually seem to have a larger percentage of their mentions being positive. Germany has seen 27% of all their mentions being positive and only 19% negative. So, just because they aren’t being talked about as much, it doesn’t necessarily mean they are worse off than their final rivals in any way.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

One last interesting chart we want to share with you is our popularity chart, which shows the mentions of each team spread out over the time of the World Cup so far. We just found this one interesting because you can actually see what days each team played on just by looking at how their mentions spike on game days. Take a look:

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Comparison Chart

So who do you think is going to win the World Cup this year? Argentina or Germany? The team with the most social mentions or the team with the most positive sentiment? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

And, for some more World Cup social media fun, be sure to check out our Sysomos #WorldCup Hashtag Tracker which is showing off where tweets containing the official #WorldCup hashtag are originating from in real-time.

Sysomos MAP and Heartbeat Updates: Tumblr, YouTube and Facebook

Let’s just say we’ve been busy. Very, very busy. 

At Sysomos, we’re always working behind the scenes to make our technology better. Whether it’s delivering greater speed and accuracy, or more data and more potent analytics, our ongoing mission is to provide you with the best social intelligence out there — so that you can make the kinds of business decisions that drive future success. With that in mind, we’d like to share some of the major enhancements we’ve made lately, including the addition of Tumblr to our ever-expanding data set.

We’ve put Tumblr on the MAP. 

Earlier this year we announced our partnership with Tumblr. Today we’re thrilled to announce our all-new Tumblr integration, which gives you the ability to glean insights from the full breadth of Tumblr’s data, has been added to MAP. In fact, you can search for mentions using text-based queries among all eight Tumblr data types — from photos, text, audio and video, to quotes, answers, links and chats. And you can evaluate those mentions using Overall Sentiment, Word Cloud and Buzzgraph analytics. Perhaps best of all, you can get started right now.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Search Results

Sysomos MAP - View Tumblr Posts

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Buzzgraph

 

You’ll love (not just ‘Like’) more Facebook results in MAP.

Enter search terms as usual and you’ll notice something right away: a lot more Facebook results. Why? We’re now pulling in tons more Facebook data. More data = more results. And that’s the kind of math everyone loves to do.

Run YouTube Analytics without skipping a Heartbeat.

You can now view no less than 17 of the most popular YouTube Channel metrics — including Geographical, Playback, Traffic Sources and Device, as well as Basic and Daily metrics — right from within the Heartbeat platform, without having to log in to YouTube.  All that’s required is a one-time permissions process in which your YouTube Channel administrator (maybe that’s even you) grants Heartbeat access to retrieve the metrics. Here’s a sample of how some of these new metrics will look in your Heartbeat:

Sysomos Heartbeat - YouTube Views

Sysomos Heartbeat - Youtube View Duration By Country

Sysomos Heartbeat - Youtube View Duration by Device

 

As always, if you’re already using MAP or Heartbeat please contact your account team with any questions.

If you’re not already using MAP or Heartbeat, please feel free to contact us to learn more about these great new updates and our software overall.

Where Does Twitter Think LeBron Is Heading? [Infographic]

If you’re a basketball fan you’ve likely heard about LeBron James over the past few days. Even if you’re not a basketball fan you’ve likely heard that as of July 1st LeBron will officially become a free agent.

Earlier this week, James made the announcement that he would not be optioning the final two years on his current contract with the Miami Heat. This means that as of July 1st any team from around the NBA can try to court King James to come and play for them.

Ever since the announcement was made, basketball fans all over the world have been speculating as to where the Power Forward may head next… if he heads anywhere new at all (he can still sign back on with the Heat with a completely new contract). LeBron’s name is being tossed around the internet with a slew of possibilities of teams from ones that seem like they could happen to ones that people would just love to see (like James coming to play for Raptors in our hometown).

So what are the most popular choices for where LeBron may wind up?

We used our powerful Sysomos software to look at Twitter conversations about LeBron James to try to figure out where the majority of people think he’ll be headed to for the 2014-15 season. We looked up LeBron’s name with appearences in tweets along side every NBA team to see which team was being favoured by the general masses. The following infographic shows the top 15 teams people are thinking he may head to.

NOTE: For this infographic we left out mentions of James along side the Miami Heat as they were seeing above average mentions for being the team he is leaving and the Cleveland Cavaliers as people are comparing this to when he left them in 2010.

Where Is LeBron Headed? A Sysomos Infographic

 

What do you think? Do you think the mass voice of Twitter is right? Where do you think LeBron James will be playing next season?

Another Big Announcement From Apple Means Another Social Explosion

WWDC 2014

Unless you live under a rock you are probably aware that yesterday Apple made a couple of big announcements at their Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC).

As we’ve shown in the past, whenever Apple makes an announcement a lot of people take notice. And a lot of people talk about it through social channels as well. Yesterday’s event was no different.

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics, we took a look at some of the talk that happened online around the WWDC and found that in true Apple fashion, everyone seemed pretty excited about it.

First, we started by taking a very general look at the event. Searching the social web on just June 2nd we found over 1.2 million social mentions of AppleWWDC or WWDC14 (the official hashtag being used for the event). These mentions were spread across 15,429 blog posts, 25,122 online news articles, 16,972 forum postings and 1,215,627 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

While Apple is based in the United States and the event took place during the morning in a US timezone, it seemed to have no affect on getting the whole world a buzz. A look at the geographic breakdown of where all of these mentions were coming from shows that 39.3% of all the mentions came from within the United States. They were followed though by countries like the United Kingdom (6.6%), France (5.1%), Germany (4.7%) and the Netherlands (4.4%).

Sysomos MAP - Overall Country Distribution

However, for a better visual of the impact of mentions about Apple’s big day, see the heat map below that plots out where those 1.2 million tweets were coming from. It appears that almost everyone around the world was interested in talking about Apple yesterday.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

All of those people from around the world also seemed to be fairly impressed with what Tim Cook showed off at the event yesterday as well. A look at overall sentiment around Apple and the WWDC came in with a 90% favourable rating.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

But what was everyone talking about? A look at our buzz graph and word cloud around Apple and the WWDC shows that people seemed to be most interested in the new features for their latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, as illustrated by the words “iPhone” and “iOS” standing out significantly in our word cloud. As well, you can see “iPhone” and “iPads” having strong connections to a lot of the other words in our buzz graph. As well, “Yosemite” appears quite significantly in both text analytics images, as it’s the name of the updated operating system for their Mac computers that was also announced yesterday.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

Sysomos MAP - Word Cloud

Next we decided to take a bit of a dive into the conversations around each of these big announcements.

OSX Yosemite

Apple said that they tried to name their new computer operating system after a location in California. They eventually settled on calling this latest update Yosemite after the famous national park.

Before we get in to the social media talk around the Yosemite OS, we have to give a big hat tip to the real Yosemite National Park for taking the great opportunity of having their name so out in the public that day by sending this gem of a tweet right after the Apple keynote:

As for the name Yosemite being out in the public yesterday, we weren’t joking, because we found it or OSX mentioned in over 275,000 social conversations yesterday. They appeared in 4,424 blog posts, 9,163 online news articles, 7,042 forum postings and 256,040 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Not only that, but they were also mentioned in 886 online videos just yesterday alone.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

We found that this new operating system was met with great favour by everyone that was talking about. When we looked at the sentiment around OSX Yosemite, we found that only 5% of all the conversations had a negative tone, giving the new OS a 95% favourable rating across social media.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

In order to determine what people were saying about Yosemite we took a look at the most retweeted tweets and popular phrases in the social conversations. From what we can see, it appears that people were just generally impressed with the overall look and feel of the new OS. Some of the most popular phrases seemed to include people talking about the “new toolbars,” “new Spotlight” and the overall look as a “great new interface.” As well, one of the most retweeted tweets was about a great new feature that allows users to send and receive SMS messages right from their computer. Also, people seem to be just mentioning the name Yosemite as the new OS name as there was a lot of speculation over what the official name would be.

Sysomos MAP - Popular Phrases From Twitter

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

iOS 8

While the new operating system for actual Apple computers seemed to get a lot of talk yesterday, the real excitement seemed to be around the debut look at their latest mobile operating system, iOS 8. When we searched for social talk around iOS 8 we found it mentioned in 1.2 million conversations. The new iOS was mentioned in 8,272 blog posts, 17,901 online news articles, 10,006 forum postings and 1,180,904 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Again, it didn’t take long to see some videos about iOS 8 either. By the end of yesterday there was already 6,154 videos posted about it in a single day.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

iOS 8 also seemed to be a big hit with those that were paying attention. When we looked at the sentiment around iOS 8 we found that it had a 94% favourable rating, meaning that only 6% of all conversations about it had a negative tone.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

So, what most caught the attention of people interested in the mobile OS? It appears that a huge pain-point from previous iterations that has been fixed in iOS 8 is the ability to get yourself out of a group chat. It turns out this was really a big issue for some people. You can see that this hit home because most of the more popular phrases we found in the conversations and 4 out of the 6 most retweeted tweets about iOS 8 made mention of it.

Sysomos MAP - Popular Phrases From Twitter

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

We highlighted just some of the most popular things we saw come out of yesterday’s WWDC keynote, but there was a ton of other great and interesting things talk about and shown off. Did it surprise you that one of your favourite announcements from yesterday didn’t show up in our analysis? Which feature(s) or announcements do you think more people should have been talking about? Let us know in the comments.

Sharing Resources To Grow The Role Of The Community Manager

Today I’m at CM1, a conference for community managers, taking place in Toronto.

Just think that 10 years ago there was no role at a company called a community manager. Today though, many companies have community managers (or sometimes they call them social media managers) and we have whole conferences set up around learning and growing for people who do this.

I did a quick search for the terms “community manager” and “community management” over the past year using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, and found that they were mentioned in 1.1 million social conversations. If that isn’t proof that this is an important role, I’m not sure what is.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

But what is a community manager?

A lot of people still see this role as “the person who plays on social media all day.” While a lot of community management is done via social media because of the access that the social web has opened to people, that’s not really a great definition for what community managers do.

My personal definition of a community manager is that they are the person (or people, depending on the size of your organization) that act as the bridge between the people inside your company and your customers, community, fans and friends outside of your company. A community manager should be the person in your organization that has their pulse on what’s going on on with your community and can relate that information to the people that need it inside your company. At the same time, they need to be informed about what’s happening inside your company so they can share that information with people outside that are interested. The community manager needs to be fully immersed in everything that is going on.

Now, that’s just my definition of what I think a community manager should be. Every company will define this a little bit differently, but it should seem somewhat like what I said above. But your company and you have to decide how you will approach community management yourself.

I had the pleasure of being the opening speaker at CM1 the last time the conference was in town and I put together a presentation that can help you decide what kind of community manager your company needs and how you will do it. Here’s my slides for you to look over yourself (they’re better with me speaking over them, but you’ll get the point):

As a community manager myself, I feel it’s important for community managers to talk and grow the role together. That’s why I’ll be taking notes and putting together a Storify of some of the great content I’ll be learning today about community management and will share it here on the blog next week.

In the meantime though, here’s a few more resources that I like to learn more about community management:

  • Community Manager Chat – This is a weekly Twitter chat that happens every Wednesday at 2pm(EST) where community managers gather to discuss tips and best practices around a different community related topics every week. To join the chat, keep an eye out for and use the hashtag #cmgrchat on Twitter.
  • The Community Manager – The Community Manager is a website dedicated to all things community management. There’s a lot of great articles on this site around brand communities, so check them out at http://thecommunitymanager.com/
  • The Community Roundtable – The Community Roundtable is a members only group where professionals focused on growing communities for their brands can interact with each other to trade stories, ideas and more. While this group may have a member fee, it may be worth it as there’s a lot of great brands and professionals you can learn from that already members. Check the group out at http://www.communityroundtable.com/

That’s just a few good resources I know of. What are some good resources for community management you use or know about? Please share with us in the comments.

The Big Data Conversation

Big Data“Big data” is not just a buzzword.

For many industries, including marketing and communications, big data is an opportunity to do things better.

For those of you still not familiar with what big data is, here’s a short definition from Wikipedia:

Big data is the term for a collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand database management tools or traditional data processing applications. The challenges include capture, curation, storage, search, sharing, transfer, analysis and visualization. The trend to larger data sets is due to the additional information derivable from analysis of a single large set of related data, as compared to separate smaller sets with the same total amount of data, allowing correlations to be found to “spot business trends, determine quality of research, prevent diseases, link legal citations, combat crime, and determine real-time roadway traffic conditions.

In simpler terms, it allows you take a lot of data that may not usually have been able to be processed together and look at it all together to come up with insights. Those insights can range from why climate is changing to how to better deliver target messages to customers. Possibilities are almost endless as long as there is data to analyze.

Here’s a great video that can help to explain it a little more visually that also has a great example of how big data can be used by a marketer to send the right message to a consumer at exactly the right time:

So, if big data is so great, why is not seeing the public adaptation that it should be?

If you run in certain circles you may be thinking, “but I can’t get away from people talking about big data these days.” I thought the same before I sat down to write this post.

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, I intended to show that big data is being adopted more as well as talked about more over the past year as people come to see its value. In the past year the term has actually been mentioned through social channels 4.9 million times.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

While almost 5 million mentions of big data is by no means a small number, there was an interesting trend in how it was being talked about. When I plotted all of those mentions out over time for the year I thought that the trend in mentions would show a steady visible rise as time went on. Instead, what I found was that the trend of mentions held relatively steady with only a slight rise in the past few months (save for that large spike in March which was caused by a conference centred around talking about big data).

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

At the same time, while talk about big data hasn’t risen all that much, a search showed me that almost 10,000 people have “big data” appearing in their Twitter bio. That tells me that there is a significant amount of people interested in the topic. If I had to guess, not nearly that many people had that term in their biographies a year ago.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Influencer Bio Search

As a company that helps people monitor, make sense of and gain insights through social media, we feel that social media can be a huge piece of the big data equation. Especially in terms of getting to know your customers better and then using that data to deliver better experiences for them. So we want to help facilitate the rise in conversation about big data.

Let’s start a conversation in the comments section of this blog. Let us know what your thoughts about big data are. Are you using bag data for business? If so, how? If you’re not, what’s holding you back?

Big data can help you do your job better by allowing you to find better insights and we want to help you do that. Let’s start by having more people talk about it. The more information everyone is armed with, the more they will be able to make big data work for them.