Posts Tagged ‘MAP’

Giving Tuesday Gets Bigger In 2014

Giving TuesdayOn Tuesday we took a look at some of the social numbers behind the people talking about Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year. But there’s one other important day that has come in to play to help kick off the holiday season in the past few years; Giving Tuesday.

Last year, we wrote about Giving Tuesday on the Marketwired blog, which was only in it’s second year of existence. While 2013 was just the second year that Giving Tuesday existed, it was only the first year we had heard about it. The idea of Giving Tuesday was born from the idea that after Americans have spent a weekend on buying things for themselves and loved ones on Black Friday through Cyber Monday, there should be a day where people can help others, which is also in line with the holiday spirit of giving.

Since last year was only the second year of Giving Tuesday’s existence, we looked at how much spread the idea had got through social media. Well, now that Giving Tuesday has had it’s third year of doing good for others, we thought it would be interesting to use MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see how it grew in 2014.

In 2013, “Giving Tuesday” or the hashtag “#GivingTuesday” appeared in about 472,000 social conversations across blogs, online news, forums and tweets. This year we saw the number of mentions rise by over 100,000. This year we found Giving Tuesday being talked about in 1,218 blog posts, 7,649 online news articles, 259 forum postings and 570,016 tweets on just December 2nd. Interestingly, most of that jump of 100,000 mentions happened on Twitter as the other three channels we looked at actually dropped.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

Since Twitter was the main driver of conversation this year, we dug a little bit deeper into what happened there. As it turns out, the number of tweets about Giving Tuesday jumped from about 19,000 mentions an hour last year to almost 24,000 mentions an hour this year. Also interesting was that we found who was tweeting about it also changed. Last year women tweeted more about Giving Tuesday than men at 52% to 48%. This year that gap widened though. In 2014 even more women were talking about Giving Tuesday and the gap grew to 54% vs 46%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

Last year we also found that 74.7% of the Giving Tuesday tweets came from the United States. This year, that number grew to 75.3% of all the tweets. But just because the United States seems to be the most involved in Giving Tuesday doesn’t make them the only ones. When we pulled up our geo-location heat map of where tweets were originating from we can actually see that people from around the world were tweeting and taking part in Giving Tuesday.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Last year we also looked at how popular the #GivingTuesday hashtag was on Instagram. Last year we found 17,630 pictures tagged with the hashtag. This year though, that number rose to 70,708… which is a fantastic rise for a great event.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

The best rise in activity that we found this year though was through the sentiment around Giving Tuesday in social channels. Last year 40% of the conversation was positive, while 13% was negative. However, this year, positive sentiment around Giving Tuesday rose to 57% and negative sentiment shrunk to 2%.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment

We were really happy to see that Giving Tuesday has seen a rise in awareness in the social sphere. We hope that it goes up even more for next year.

We’re curious to know how charities saw a rise on Giving Tuesday though. If you work for or with a charity, please leave us a comment and let us know what you saw happen on Giving Tuesday and how it changed from last year.

Black Friday by the Social Numbers

Black Friday SaleNumbers vary on depending on where you look, but a lot of people seem to think that Black Friday this year didn’t generate the sales numbers that retailers were looking for. In fact, a lot of outlets are claiming that Black Friday sales numbers this year went down when compared to last year.

But sales numbers aside, Black Friday was still event that people were talking about. And a lot of that talk and sharing of sales and deals was happening though social media.

We decided to take a quick look to see just how many conversation were happening about Black Friday this year using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

Looking for mentions of “Black Friday” or the “#BlackFriday” hashtag on Friday November 28th, we found over 3.5 million social mentions on just that single day. That was 17,330 blog posts, 31,221 online news articles, 51,741 forum postings and 3,426,440 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Black Friday

While shopping is sometimes seen as something women prefer to do over men, when we looked a little bit deeper into those Black Friday tweets on Nov. 28th, we actually found that men were tweeting more about it than women by just barely more at 52% vs 48%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary for Black Friday

Now, if you think that 3.5 million conversations about shopping sales in a single day is a lot, you’re probably right. In fact, when we looked at the mentions of Black Friday for the week culminating on the 28th, we actually found that mentions on the day were half of all the mentions. From November 22nd through the 28th the total mentions of Black Friday across social channels was just over 7 million.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for the Week of Black Friday

When we trend those numbers out across the week, we can actually see just how much the mentions of Black Friday rise until the day actually hits. Most of the week before seems to have a few mentions happening each day, but we can really see people starting to prepare and talk about Black Friday on the 27th (which is the American Thanksgiving). But then on the 28th, when Black Friday hits, the numbers just skyrocket.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart for the Week of Black Friday

When we dug deeper into Twitter mentions for the whole week, we found that men and women equaled out in their shares of mentions. What’s more interesting though, is the actual number of tweets that occurred. Even if we minus the number of tweets we showed above that happened on Black Friday (3,426,440) we still have 3.3 million tweets that mentioned Black Friday leading up to the actual day. This is very different than we saw in a post that we did back in 2012 that showed only 1.1 million tweets in the two weeks leading up to Black Friday. That means talk of Black Friday has tripled in those two years.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary of the Week of Black Friday

Now, just to be fair, since yesterday was “Cyber Monday,” we thought it would be interesting to also compare the mentions of that to Black Friday. We were really surprised with what we found here.

Many financial publications speculated over the weekend that Black Friday sales weren’t as high this year because people were waiting buy their stuff online instead on Cyber Monday. However, when we looked at how many times “Cyber Monday” or the hashtag “#CyberMonday” was used yesterday we were very surprised. Mentions of Cyber Monday didn’t even hit the 1 million mark yesterday. There was only 7,099 blog posts, 13,065 online news articles, 10,703 forum postings and 806,668 tweets yesterday containing our key terms.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary for Cyber Monday

Now none of these mentions have any real effect on what sales were like, but we were surprised to see the low number of mentions of Cyber Monday yesterday.

What do you think is happening here? Are people done with the big shopping sales day? Or people just not talking about it as much through social media? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Sysomos MAP and Heartbeat Updates: Tweet Life and Spredfast Integration

We’re super excited to tell you about two new features that you’ll be able to find in our software starting today; Tweet Life in MAP and Spredfast Integration in Heartbeat.

Tweet Life

The way that a message spreads can be very important to you. Knowing how your message spreads beyond your immediate network can help make or break the resonance of your message. You can know how many times a message has been retweeted, but wouldn’t it be nice to know which people helped to spread your message the furthest?

Well, as of today, you no longer have to wonder how your tweets are spreading through the Twitter network. Today we’re super excited to tell you about MAP’s latest feature Tweet Life.

Tweet Life shows you the path of a tweet as it spreads. Tweet Life shows you which of your followers retweeted your message, which of THEIR followers retweeted your message, and so on.

Sysomos MAP - Tweet Life Tweet Tree

Tweet Life analytics can be accessed in a variety of ways. The first is to copy the tweet ID directly from a tweet’s URL and paste it into the ID box on the Tweet Life section of Twitter in MAP.

Sysomos MAP - Tweet Life - Analyze A Tweet by Tweet ID

The second way to access the Tweet Life analytics of a tweet is to find a tweet of interest under the Most Retweeted tab of Twitter in MAP and directly under all the tweets that appear on the page, you will have the ability to click a “Tweet Life” link.

Sysomos MAP - Tweet Life via Most Retweeted

So why would you want to see the life of a tweet? Here are just a few examples of how this new great feature can help you:

  • Compare the spread of different Tweets from your own accounts to investigate whether specific language, themes or times of day are most effective for spreading your message.
  • Discover how your message reached, and was spread by, Twitter users who are NOT your followers.
  • Benchmark how quickly your tweets spread to help you find ways to increase the velocity and virality of your social communications.
  • Compare the retweet engagement of your tweets against your competitors and identify the key individuals who are most likely to help your messages spread further.

For more information on how to use, understand and make the most of the new Tweet Life functionality, don’t hesitate to reach out to your Sysomos representative who will be happy to provide you with more information and answer any of your questions.

Spredfast Integration in Heartbeat

Back in June we announced a partnership between Spredfast and ourselves. This partnership would allow Heartbeat users who also have a Spredfast account to send social content found through Sysomos over to the Spredfast engagement platform.

Today, we’re happy to announce that all of the behind-the-scenes work has been completed and Spredfast integration is now live in Heartbeat!

If you’re a customer of Spredfast as well as Sysomos please contact your Sysomos representative who will be happy to help get your Spredfast account setup in Heartbeat.

Once you’re set up, the use couldn’t be easier. Simply click on the tool tip next to a tweet or Facebook post in the “Your Heartbeats” tab of Heartbeat. You will then see a new tab marked “Spredfast.” Under that tab you can reply to both tweets and Facebook posts and retweet tweets. Once you click one of the options a Spredfast window will pop up and allow you to take action. All actions will be recorded both in Heartbeat and Spredfast’s workflow logs for you to see afterwards.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Spredfast Integration

That’s all from us today. But we have a lot more cool stuff that we’re working on and can’t wait to share with you soon.

If you’re already a Sysomos customer and want to learn more about these great new updates, please feel free to reach out to your Sysomos representative.

If you’re not already a Sysomos customer but would like to learn more about these features and Sysomos overall, please feel free to contact us here.

John Oliver Gets Spreading Information In The Social Age

Last Week Tonight with John OliverYou can debate back and forth for days on whether Last Week Tonight is a news program or a comedy and entertainment show… or even both. But one thing you can’t debate is that John Oliver has been instrumental in opening the eyes of his viewers to subjects that they should probably know more about.

And when we say viewers, we don’t just mean the people who watch his show live on HBO, we mean everyone that has seen the numerous clips from John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight since it debuted at the end of April this year.

Yes, the show we’re talking about is an HBO program, which means that viewers need to subscribe to HBO through their cable company to see the show live as it airs on Sunday nights. However, what John Oliver’s show has done that not many other shows do, especially ones on premium cable subscription channels, is found a way to make his interesting content very sharable by putting all of his segments up on YouTube.

And this is why we say that John Oliver gets it. He knows that if you want your content to spread it has to be three things; interesting, entertaining and sharable. Last Week Tonight is all three of these, which is why it got so popular so fast.

We used MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to dig a little deeper on the social phenomenon that is is John Oliver’s brand of entertaining news.

Since Last Week Tonight debuted at the end of April this year, the show’s name or John Oliver have appeared in over 818,000 social media posts.  Mentions have appeared in 14,496 blog posts, 17,346 online news articles, 26,152 forum postings and 760,222 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

There has also been, over the same time period, 11,973 videos posted that have John Oliver or Last Week Tonight mentioned in their titles or descriptions. And, to add to that, only 83 of those videos come from the show’s own YouTube channel.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

While the number of mentions that John Oliver and Last Week Tonight have received since their show debuted is by no means an astronomical number, it’s really what was in those posts and how many people saw them that mattered. And what was in them, was videos from their YouTube channel.

You see, John Oliver and Last Week Tonight knew that not everyone has an HBO subscription. So they made their content easy to find and share somewhere else, the world’s second largest search engine, YouTube. And it’s been working for them.

We pulled up some of the stats from the Last Week Tonight YouTube page. What we found that the channel has over a million subscribers. Even better though is that the 83 videos posted to the channel have amassed over 150 million views. That’s not bad since the channel has only existed for just about 6 months.

Sysomos MAP - YouTube Channel Analysis

Even more impressive is when we looked at which of his videos were the most popular. The top five most popular videos from the channel weren’t the short funny little two minute videos. All five of them were the show’s longer form feature stories that average around 14 minutes in runtime.

Sysomos MAP - Most Viewed Videos On Last Week Tonight's YouTube Channel

Even more interesting though is when we go back to the social mentions of John Oliver and Last Week Tonight we started talking about. When we look at those mentions on our popularity chart, which plots out the mentions over time, we can see a bunch of large spikes in conversation. All of them, including the largest spike on August 18th, happen on Mondays, the day after the show airs on HBO. People would literally be waiting for the videos to go up the next morning so they could see them and share them.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

So, what can you learn from John Oliver and Last Week Tonight?

The main take-aways we see here is that there is no magic length for how long a blog post or a video should be to optimize how much your content gets shared through social media. Your content should be as long as it needs to, as long as you can keep it interesting, entertaining and make it easily sharable. If you can do that, people will be anxiously waiting for your content so they can see it and share it.

And now, just for fun and so those of you not familiar with the show can understand what we’re talking about, here’s one of our favourite clips from the first season of Last Week Tonight (of course it has to do with the internet):

 

Taylor Swift vs Spotify

Taylor Swift - 1989There can be little debate that Taylor Swift is the hottest thing in music today (I mean, come on. That “Shake it off” song is so just happy and catchy).

There’s also little room for debate that the music industry is very different today than a decade ago, with streaming services being favoured more and more over actually buying albums.

If both of these things are true, then why has Taylor Swift decided to remove all of her music from Spotify, the largest of the streaming music services?

Last week, Swift released her latest album, 1989. However, users of streaming services like Spotify noticed that the album wasn’t on any of the streaming services on the release date. While disappointing, this isn’t very uncommon. A bunch of artists have chose to hold off on adding their albums to streaming services for a few weeks after release to drive initial album sales. And this tactic worked for Swift, as she saw over 1.3 million album sales in the first week, making 1989 the biggest first week for an album since Eminem’s 2002 The Eminem Show.

However, not releasing her new album to the streaming services was just the first step. On Monday, Taylor Swift pulled her entire catalogue of music off of Spotify. A move that many are questioning and talking about.

We decided to look at the conversation around this topic using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, by searching for mentions of Taylor Swift and Spotify that have appeared together in the past 3 days. In that time we found just under 80,000 mentions across social channels like Twitter, blogs, forums and online news sites. By no means is this a large amount, but it does start to show that the topic is on people’s minds.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

There’s also been 249 videos created over the past 3 days that mention both Swift and Spotify in their title or descriptions. Many of these videos question why the artist would do such a thing and many more plead for Taylor to put her music back up so they can listen to it.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

This cry is being heard around the world. When we looked at where all of the talk was coming from we found that the United States was making the most noise about the subject (over 52% of it), but a lot of other countries were also talking about. Under the pie chart is a heat map of where tweets mentioning T-Swift and Spotify were coming from and you can see that Twitter users across the globe are talking about this.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

We also looked at some of these tweets that were happening. The most retweeted tweet that we’ve found on the subject comes from Spotify’s own Twitter account. Spotify made a very clever tweet of a playlist they put together trying to get Taylor Swift to come back to them.

 

While the numbers that we’re seeing right now around this subject aren’t earth shattering, they do make us start to think about this new world we’ve embraced.

With so many companies these days seeing the value in being social, sharing and streaming their content, why has the biggest artist in the world right now decided to go the opposite route? Let us know your thoughts on this in the comments.

Will this be a permanent thing? And if so, will Spotify be able to shake it off? (See what I did there?)

Just How Popular Is Ello?

ElloEllo seems to be the favourite new kid on the social media block as of the past few weeks. Yesterday on the blog Mark even wrote about how many users are claiming they’re moving over to Ello to “escape” Facebook.

But is it really possible for Ello to replace Facebook?

In my personal opinion, I’d say not quite. For one thing (and this is my personal thought), I think that Ello feels a lot more like Twitter currently than Facebook. And secondly, and probably most importantly, in order for Ello to actually replace Facebook in people’s lives, the exodus over to the new network would have to be enormous. The only way that Ello could replace Facebook is if all of your friends and contacts that you’ve connected with over the years all moved there. That will take a very long time… if it happens at all.

But even with my personal thoughts on Ello, I wondered just how popular Ello has actually become in the past few weeks?

On September 26th, just as Ello was starting to go viral, Vox (along with many other sources) reported that the network was receiving 31,000 invite requests an hour. That seems pretty popular to me.

To investigate further, I decided to see what conversations were happening on other social networks about this new social network (very meta, I know).

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, I looked up mentions of Ello over the past month. One hindrance to my search though was that I could only search for English conversations because “ello” in Spanish translates to “it” making it a very common word. So, please keep that in mind when looking at the information below.

If you follow the big names and outlets that talk a lot about social media, you may feel like you’ve been over hearing about Ello. However, when I conducted my search for conversations about the new network I found less than 350,000 mentions of it. In the past month, Ello only came up in 3,042 blog posts, 3,321 online news articles, 3,716 forum postings and 332,692 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

While those numbers may not be as big as people who are hearing about it nonstop may expect, it’s also interesting to note that the majority of those conversations have only happened in the past two weeks.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart Without Twitter Data

Since Ello is being dubbed the “anti-Facebook” it made sense for me to also search public Facebook data to see how much it was being talked about there. Again, the number of Ello mentions I found there was not quite as large as I initially thought it was going to be. That said, it has still accounted for 28,598 mentions in public status updates. Also interesting is that if you look at the three examples in the screenshot below, you’ll notice that a lot of the mentions are people posting a link to their new Ello account on Facebook. It’s interesting because people feel the need to use Facebook to tell their friends that they’ve joined the “anti-Facebook.”

Sysomos MAP - Facebook Activity Summary

As with any new social network, people want to understand it and why they should consider grabbing real-estate there. To help with that, there’s already been just over 1,000 videos created that try to explain Ello to others.

Sysomos MAP - Video Activity Summary

So, what are people saying about Ello so far? A look at both our buzzgraph and word clouds around the network show that “Facebook” seems to be one of the most used words when people talk about Ello. There is also a significant talk about Ello’s “manifesto”. This manifesto is what seems to be the appeal behind Ello, as it states that people will have more “privacy” as they will never sell your “data” for “advertising.” However, that’s also making people question how the network will stay in “business” for a sustained amount of time.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph

Sysomos MAP - Word Cloud

The other thing that I found interesting about the apparent popularity of Ello revealed itself when I used our Influencer Community tool to see the groups of people that were talking about it. If you’re anything like me, and I assume you might be since you’re reading this blog, you probably follow a lot of sources online that talk about news and trends in the digital and social media space. Well, those are the types of sources seem to be the ones who are perpetuating the talk of Ello. If you look at the big blue community, it’s filled with popular sources for social media news like Forbes Tech, Gigaom and Medium, but also with social media influencers such as @briansolis and @AmyVernon. So, while it may seem to people who work in and follow the social media space that Ello is all the rage, it may really just be the social media people getting each other excited in a big circle.

Interesting as well is that the second largest community I found, in orange below, is a big group of celebrities (mostly from the music industry). When I investigated that group a bit further it seems that fans are tweeting to find out if their favourite celebrities are on Ello yet and where they can find them there.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Influencer Communities

While the real fate of Ello is still up in the air, being that it’s only been popular for a bout two weeks now, it does seem to have a lot of fans. A look at the sentiment around the network shows that it’s 86% favourable.

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment Summary

So, what do you think about Ello so far? Is it going to replace Facebook or is it just going to see some hype for a little while and then fall off? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Big Growth and Big News

Now it’s not usually like us to toot our own horn, but we have some big news to share today and we thought this would be a good time to tell you a bit about what got us here first.

The first thing that we’re incredibly happy about is that in a few days the Sysomos engine that powers both our MAP and Heartbeat software will be processing 400 billion social conversations at any given time. That’s a 4 with 11 zeros behind it (400,000,000,000). That’s an incredible amount of data to process in mere seconds, but we do it every day.

And it’s just going to keep growing. On May 30, 2013 we looked at how many social conversations were happening in a day and found at that time 139 million conversations just across blogs, online news sites, forums and Twitter. Yesterday, we found that that number has grown to 401 million (that’s equal to over 4 terabytes of data a day). In a little over a year, the number of social conversations has more than doubled.

Sysomos MAP - Over 400 Million Social Conversations A Day

But we’re prepared to deal with this ever-growing world of social media by growing with it.

Since last September, we’ve grown our Sysomos family by 50%. We’ve added amazing teammates in every department of our company from accounts to engineering and all the way up to our executive team. All these people have been key in helping us to help you make sense of all those social conversations happening out there. In fact, we’ve had to grow so much because we’ve also grown over 500% on the accounts we’re helping, which we’re proud to say includes 8 of the top 10 brands on Interbrand’s list of the 100 best global brands.

And we’re not done growing.

Today, we’re very excited to announce that as part of this growth, we’ve added a new teammate to our team. As of today Amber Naslund (@AmberCadabra) will be joining our team as the Senior Vice President of Marketing for Sysomos.

Amber Naslund

Amber won’t say it herself, but she’s a big mover and shaker in the world of social media. She’s worked in the industry for over 8 years including experience with companies very similar to Sysomos. On top of her experience, she’s constantly being asked to speak at various events and conferences and even co-authored a book on how social media has impacted all business today, The NOW Revolution.

We’re incredibly excited to have Amber on our team and can’t wait to see what she has in mind to help Sysomos grow even more.

To learn more about Amber and find out what she has in mind for her new role, come back tomorrow when we’ll be posting a little Q&A with Amber.

Feel free to reach out to Amber at anytime on Twitter or in the comments below and help us welcome her to the team!

More On Timing Your Social Media Posts…

TimingYesterday here on the blog, Mark wrote about a an infographic that told people the best times to post to different social networks. The makers of that infographic, SurePayroll, are not the first people to try to tell the world about these “best times to post.” Buffer, the app that helps people share articles spread out over time, has made posts about this before and we even put out a report a few years ago that contained information on when Twitter users are most active, which could give you a good idea of when to post.

Seeing things like this give people a good idea as to when the majority of Twitter users seem to be most active, which could be a good place to start testing if those times work for your brand. However, I’ve personally always been a proponent of really knowing your audience, which means finding out what times are best for THEM specifically and not just everyone.

An example I’ve used many times when speaking to people about this topic is brands that focus on a younger demographic. While many reports and infographics show that peak times to tweet are somewhere between 9am-3pm Monday through Thursday, that’s not great timing for brands to reach teenagers as they should be in school at that time and (hopefully) not checking Twitter.

So, after reading yesterday’s post, I decided to put my theory to the test and to show the world.

In both our MAP and Heartbeat software we have a great feature that we call “Best Time To Tweet.” This feature looks at all of the people following a brand (usually your brand) to see when these specific followers are most active on Twitter. We then lay out a graph for you showing these levels of activity and suggest that some of these most active times of your followers would likely be the best time for your brand to tweet.

I picked a couple of interesting brands to highlight as an example below and show that each brand will have a unique best time to tweet that they can only really know by understanding their audience. The graphs below show that followers of a Twitter account are more active when the squares on the grid are a darker shade of blue.

In the sense of fairness, I started by analyzing my own Twitter handle. I live in Toronto and do a lot of my tweeting with the world during business hours. So, it was no surprise that a lot of my followers are active during those times too. As you can see, most of my followers are very active between 9am-5pm(EST) on weekdays.

@40deuce@40deuce's Best Time To Tweet

I then looked at our @Sysomos handle. While we have a lot of followers from around the world, it still seems that our followers are most active during business hours as well.

@Sysomos@Sysomos's Best Time To Tweet

But what about consumer based brands? Their target audience and followers may not be people doing business during business hours.

I started by taking a look at @CocaCola, a brand known around the world. Coke has no specific demographic as they want to reach anyone interested in a refreshing beverage from around the world. When I analyzed their Twitter followers, it appeared that they were most active in the afternoons, which is probably a good time for people to take a break and grab a Coke. So for @CocaCola, it might be best to tweet at people looking for that break.

@CocaCola@CocaCola's Best Time To Tweet

To test my theory about kids being in school during what others say are the peak times to tweet, I looked at the @DisneyChannel, a channel with children’s programming all day in the US. As it turns out, their followers are being most active on Twitter between 1pm-10pm(EST). That shows that their fans start to become active on Twitter when school is ending, so for them to tweet in the morning may not make sense, but hitting up that after school crowd would.

@DisneyChannel@DisneyChannel's Best Time To Tweet

I then started to experiment a little bit more with this.

The next brand I decided to look at was the @WWE, who has a very active Twitter account all day every day. When I analyzed their followers it turned out that they are most active on Monday nights between 8pm-10pm. That also just happens to be the time that RAW, their flagship TV show airs. So, for the WWE, it pays for them to be the most active while people are watching and tweeting along with RAW.

@WWE@WWE's Best Time To Tweet

Next, I looked at @TacoBell, the Mexican fast food chain. Now, Taco Bell is known to have a stereotype of having a special affinity from a late night crowd of teenagers and college students. However, it may not actually be such a sterotype. When I analyzed their account to see when their followers are most active, it turned out they were tweeting the most between 8pm-midnight almost all week long. So, rather than shrugging off that stereotype, it may actually be better for them to embrace it and to tweet when their followers really are most active.

@TacoBell@TacoBell's Best Time To Tweet

Some friends of mine on Twitter suggested that @EAT24 is a great brand to follow on Twitter. I had never heard of them (because they are US based and not in Canada where I can use them yet), but they’re an app that makes ordering pick-up or delivery food easy for people across the US. As it turns out, being an app for food they want to be available when people are hungry. When I looked at their followers, they were most active from about 11am-1am(EST), all times when people are hungry and thinking about ordering food. Interestingly, Friday afternoons are when their followers are most active, which also just happens to be when people are thinking about ordering food for Friday night after a long week when they don’t want to cook.

@EAT24@EAT24's Best Time To Tweet

Lastly, I decided to get a little worldly. I looked at the account for @Westpac, a bank in Australia. Australia is currently 14 hours ahead of my Eastern Standard Timezone. So, when I analyzed their followers to see when they’re most active it wasn’t surprising to find that their best time to tweet was in the middle of my night.

@Westpac@Westpac's Best Time To Tweet

Now, these are just a few brands on Twitter. Every brand will see that their fans or followers are active during different times of the day. Also, different social networks see activity at different times of the day. For some of these networks where you may not be able to see follower analytics as easy, testing may be the best way to find out when your best time to post to them would be.

So, we want to know, how do you know when the best time to post to a social network is for your fan base? Let us know how you determine it in the comments.

Talk Of The Scottish Referendum In Social Media

The Scottish ReferendumThis Thursday is going to be a big day in the United Kingdom.

On Thursday the people of Scotland will be voting on referendum that would see Scotland breaking off from the United Kingdom and England to become it’s own country. Of course, this is a huge deal for everyone in the United Kingdom.

People have been talking about this referendum for almost two years, but now that it’s getting down to crunch time, we thought it would be interesting to see what people have been saying for the past month in social media around it.

Using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, we searched through social channels for people using the referendum’s official hashtag, #IndyRef, and social conversations that contain both Scotland AND referendum for the past 30 days.

Our search came up with over 2.7 million results. Our search terms showed 9,403 blog posts, 36,161 online news articles, 8,160 forum postings and 2,673,318 tweets that have been talking about the upcoming referendum vote.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

While, of course this has been part of a great deal of conversation, especially in the United Kingdom, for a few months, when we looked at these mentions spread out across the past month, we can really see the referendum talk ramp up in the past few days as the vote becomes eminent.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

As we’ve mentioned a few times already, this is news around the world, but especially in the United Kingdom. When we looked to see where conversations about the Scottish referendum were coming from, it wasn’t surprising that the majority of it came from the United Kingdom. 59.9% of all the conversation was actually coming from the United Kingdom. Interestingly enough, the two largest “colony” countries also seem to be keeping an eye on what’s going on with Australia accounting for 3.5% of the conversation and Canada with 3.4%.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

However, many people around the world outside of the colonial countries are keeping an eye on what’s happening and also talking about it. A look at our geo location heat map of tweets that have surfaced in the past month that meet our search criteria shows that people around the globe are in fact interested in what’s going to happen on Thursday.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Since we were already looking at Twitter, we decided to dig in and see what hashtags were being used most when people were tweeting about the Scottish referendum. When we look at the list below of the top 10 hashtags being used we can see that five of the 10 seem to be on the #VoteYes side, which is the side vying for Scotland’s independence. On the flip side of that, only two of the top 10 hashtags being used seem to support Scotland staying part of the United Kingdom; the #BetterTogether and #NoThanks hashtags.

Sysomos MAP - Top Hashtags on Twitter

For one last idea of which side of this referendum might be winning, we decided to compare the #VoteYes and #NoThanks hashtags side-by-side over the past month. When we did this, we found that #VoteYes hashtag has a commanding voice in the social space over #NoThanks with 87% of those conversations.

Sysomos MAP - Comparison of Overall Activity

There seems to be a lot of chatter pushing towards Scotland becoming it’s own country on Thursday, but social talk is only one thing. Only the votes will really tell.

For a much better (and funnier) explanation of what the Scottish referendum is about and what’s been happening, here’s a great (and hilarious) video from Last Week Tonight‘s John Oliver:

What do you think is going to happen on Thursday?

Lots Of Hype Leading To Today’s Apple Announcement

Tim Cooks Reveals New Apple ProductsSeptember is the new Christmas if you’re an Apple fanboy (or girl).

If you watch the world of tech you’re likely aware that Apple will be making a big announcement today. September has become the annual time when they show off and release the latest version of the iPhone to the world. A lot of people have been waiting a while for this announcement as the phones are supposed to get an all new design, probably get larger and will likely have a bunch of fancy new bells and whistles.

But the phone (or possibly phones if the rumours are true) isn’t the only thing that people are excited to hear about today. It is also rumoured that Apple will be unveiling their first piece of wearable technology, which is expected to be called the iWatch. As well, earlier this year Apple showed off iOS8, the software that the new phones will run, and they have a tendency to release new mobile operating systems on the same day or within a few days after these September announcement events.

There’s a lot to look forward today.

Since a lot of people have been anticipating this day for quite some time, we thought it would be fun to look at the hype leading up to today in the social media world using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software.

We started by casting a wide net and looking for mentions of Apple and a bunch it’s already popular and newly expected products like iPads, iPhones, the iWatch and iOS. Doing a search for mentions of these things over the past six month shows a whopping 538 million results. We found 2,504,900 blog posts, 3,973,049 online news articles, 13,136,384 forum postings and 518,580,160 tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary

If we look at those mentions over time, we can clearly see that there’s almost never a lull in talk about Apple and its products. We can see that there was a large spike in activity around the beginning of June when Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, took the stage at their WWDC (World Wide Develop Conference) to announce iOS8 to the world. The second spike we see around the beginning of August is a strange one. After we did bit a research into the spike it appeared to be a few days of a flurry of tweets that were promoting a game for iPhones and iPads called Big Business HD, but we’re not quite sure why (no offence to the game makers).

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart

We then looked into which countries seem to be the most interested in Apple and their products. Not surprising, the most mentions of Apple and Apple products came from the United States. They accounted for 33.1% of all mentions. The next closest countries were China with 12.6% of mentions and then the UK with 6%. However, you can also see that a lot of other countries are represented in the pie chart below as the world seems to be in love with Apple.

Sysomos MAP - Country Distribution

For a better idea of how world-wide the talk about Apple is we pulled up a geo location heat map of where tweets about Apple and their products are originating from. In this image we can see just how wide spread the talk is throughout the globe.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

All of this data shouldn’t be so surprising though. Everyone knows that people love Apple products (and love to talk about them as well). So we wanted to also know which of the upcoming announcements today people are most looking forward to.

Here we compared talk specifically about the iPhone 6, iWatch and iOS8 to see what people were going to be most excited to hear about today.

Looking at talk of these three things over the past six months we found that the iPhone 6 has been talked about the most coming in with 7,888,715 mentions. That’s not too surprising seeing that iPhones are big sellers and people are more worried about their phone than what operating system their running on that phone. That said though, iOS 8 came in second with 3,222,731 mentions over the past six months, which is still a significant amount of chatter. The iWatch only racked up 1,645,256 mentions showing that people are still excited to find out about it, but don’t seem as concerned with owning a wearable device as they are with a phone.

Sysomos MAP - Share of Voice Comparison

When we looked at the talk of these specific products over time, that spike in mentions when iOS 8 was announced in June becomes much more apparent. It’s also interesting to note how over the past month as we got closer to today talk about the new iPhone 6 that is likely going to be announced today has been steadily on the rise.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Overtime Comparison

One other interesting thing we noted while comparing talk around the products was where they were talked about. The iPhone 6 dominated social conversations in each channel we looked at, except in blogs. On blogs, the iWatch seems to be of the most interest. A theory as to why this may have occurred is that bloggers have a bit more room to speculate over things that reporters that write for online news sources and on Twitter you just get the general public, who is more interested in the phones than anything else. But that’s just a theory. What do you think?

Sysomos MAP - Comparison by Source

Are you excited to hear what Apple announces today? Let us know what you’re most excited to hear about. Is it one of the three things we looked at? Or will it be “one more thing” that Apple will sneak in that no one was expecting?