Posts Tagged ‘sysomos’

Qualitative vs Quantitative Social Media Reporting

When it comes to reporting on your social media efforts there’s many f ways that it can actually be done. Every company is going to have their own style and every manager or boss is going to have their own way that they like to see reports.

No matter what format your company, boss or client likes, it always comes down to two big questions when it’s time to do the reporting; Do I take the quantitative or the qualitative route?

The truth is, each side has it’s own merits.

Quantitative Reporting

Just-the-Facts-Maam

Quantitative reporting means presenting hard numbers as your measurements. Think of “quantity.” Quantitative measurements are things that are real measurements, These are going to be all of the things that you can actually count and show cold hard facts towards. As we mentioned in an earlier blog post this month, your goals in social media should have something measurable tied to them that helps you know that you’re working towards your brand’s goals.

Managers like to see quantitative reporting because these types of reports have the actual numbers that show how you’re advancing towards your goals or anomalies that can then be analyzed to determine why numbers move in a certain way.

Some exmaples of things that can be measured quantitatively in social media include:

Increases (or decreases) in fans/followers

Sysomos MAP - Change In Followers Over Time

Number of mentions your brand gets

Sysomos Heartbeat - Mentions Count

Number of clicks you get when sharing links

Bit.ly Shows Number Of Clicks To A Custom URL

And share of voice between you and your competitors

Sysomos Heartbeat - Share of Voice

Of course, these are just a few types of quantitative measurements that can be taken. One of the nice things about social media is that because it happens online, most things can be tracked and measured in a quantitative form.

 

Qualitative Reporting

But-why-meme1

If the key to quantitative reporting is to think of “quantity,” then qualitative reporting should make you think of “quality.” Qualitative reporting has less to do with hard numbers and more to do with the underlying meaning and interpretations behind those numbers. These are going to be the things that add meaning and value to your hard numbers.

So, for example, quantitative reporting might tell you how many times your brand has been mentioned in social media, but qualitative reporting will look at “why” your company was getting those mentions. What were people saying? Were you being mentioned for good or bad reasons? Were mentions consistant with your brand’s message? And so on.

Qualitative reporting is great because it helps to tell the story behind what’s actually happening in social media.

Some examples of things that can be looked at qualitatively in social media include:

What drove the conversation (using text analytics)

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph (Text Analytics)

What was most popular (looking at things like the most retweeted tweets)

Sysomos MAP - Most Retweeted Tweets

What was the sentiment around our brand (even though sentiment can have a number associated with it, it’s still more of a qualitative measurement)

Sysomos Heartbeat - Overall Sentiment

 

So, what’s best?

Now that we’ve given a breakdown of the differences are between quantitative and qualitative measurements, you need to decide what is the best way to put them into your social media reports.

My best suggestion would be to do what I do when I create reports and use a mix of both. Show the numbers that matter towards your goals with qualitative measurements, but then dig deeper with a qualitative analysis as to why those numbers were showing as they did. What drove them? What was the underlying meaning of all those numbers? What’s the story behind the numbers?

An example of this mixing method could be with customer satisfaction: It’s easy to count how many times you replied to a customer service request via social media. But how can you gauge the satisfaction of that customers interaction, since having them leave the interaction feeling positive about it is likely your goal if you’re doing customer service? The feeling of satisfaction doesn’t have any real numbers associated with it, but if you look deeper into those interactions (by using some of the methods we gave examples of above like text analytics and sentiment analysis) you can make a judgement call on if the customer left the interaction feeling satisfied. That way you can say, “We had 17 customer support issues last week and we were able to solve 15 of them (quantitative hard numbers) and the customer satisfaction rate for those solved issues was 85% satisfied (a qualitative number derived from looking at those interactions).”

Or, for a real world example, last week we announced that we have acquired Expion. For my reporting of that event I gave our team hard numbers of how many times Sysomos and Expion were mentioned together in social media, but then I dove into the text analytics around all of those mentions we received to show our team not just that people were talking about it, but what they were actually saying. We found words like (to toot our own horn a little bit) “unrivalled,” “undisputed” and “combined force” with a great positive sentiment rating, so I was able to tell our team not only did we get a lot buzz about the announcement, but that it was also received very positively.

By combining both quantitative and qualitative into your social media reports you will wind up with a finished product that pleases everyone and helps them to understand what’s happening in your brand’s social media world. You will have numbers that show your boss or client the hard numbers that are moving them towards goals, but you’ll also have a way to explain why things are happening and why those numbers are moving. The benefit of combining both is that you can also create a narrative in your reports, which makes them easier for everyone to understand whether their a numbers person or not.
Do you want to measure both quantitatively and qualitatively at the same time? Request a demo of our Sysomos software and we’ll show you how we can help.

The End of Rose In Cannes As We Know It!

Well, maybe not…but after attending the Cannes Lions Advertising Festival for the past few years as a Media company person (First with Microsoft and then with Clear Channel) it was a different experience bringing my new CEO of Sysomos to Cannes for the first time. Seeing the festival through the eyes of a Big Data person certainly changed my view of the future of the industry. With a lot of the talk being around data, the undelivered promises to date of Data Science and marketing and the sheer confusion on a lot of clients and customers faces, it was a much different Cannes this year.

Cannes Lions 2015

The questions on data range from not trusting the data, to building true real time ROI/attribution modeling that can better shape a campaign across Paid, Shared, Owned, Earned. To do the latter, we have to build systems that can ingest and analyze any and all forms of structured and unstructured data and give more control of the systems to the Agencies and clients. Of course all the while protecting data privacy and the consumers. But I’m encouraged that the discussion is actually more around the consumer and their experience than simple data. We want Paid, Shared, Owned and Earned content to enhance the user experience. If we can do that, then stories are relevant and welcome, not intrusive and unwanted.

The good news is we know we can solve a lot of the issues. Data Science to date has largely been built for the “experts”, keeping a lot of the great insights to small groups who are overworked with all the requests while at the same time overwhelmed with the various tool sets, none of which are completely doing what they want. I can remember announcing “Looking Glass” back in 2010 at Advertising Week. “Looking Glass” was a Microsoft built prototype tool for listening to Social, monitoring and reacting/engaging with users on Social. Microsoft never really got the product to market, but it was my first look into how the growing and changing social world could impact all of marketing and beyond. And, the growing desire for such tools and platforms from Agencies and Clients. We filled our 10 beta spots before I left the Times Center that day.

Today at Sysomos, we compete in a very competitive market of Social Listening/Research/Monitoring and again we are at the beginning. The meetings in Cannes with friends and colleagues left me nodding every time, “yes…we can help that…and that…and that”. From Creative process to all areas of media, to analyzing the return across Paid, Earned, Shared, Owned…even to how best align Brands and Talent in a way that’s genuine and authentic (whether that talent is a proven celebrity or an emerging platform star).

Sysomos Partnered With OMD for The Big Question Everyday Through The Cannes Lions

There is no question that Cannes has changed dramatically in the past decade and beyond. From P&G showing up as a client to the invasion of the Tech giants, from traditional media parties to social media dominance to a swarm of Ad Tech innovators. One thing is for sure is that we seem to be getting back to thinking about customers holistically and using media and technology to enhance our story telling, not replace it. I joined Sysomos three months ago to help just that. Not to have data drive the decisions blindly, but to guide and enhance the amazing creativity you seen at Cannes Lions. We have work to do, but I’m encouraged by our new direction and energy and by the willingness of our partners and clients to add energy and innovation with us.

Expion Joins #TeamSysomos

Welcome to #TeamSysomos, Expion!

Today I’m thrilled to announce that Sysomos has acquired Expion, a leading social marketing platform.

Expion has been recently recognized by Forrester as “one of the most significant social relationship platform providers,” for their content management and publishing capabilities, which will perfectly complement our robust, data-driven analytics platform.

Together, Sysomos and Expion will give more than 15,000 marketers, representing 1,500 companies, the power to better understand their customers, reach new relevant audiences and deliver more compelling customer experiences. We will now offer a complete content marketing and analytics solution, empowering the world’s biggest brands by adding context to millions of online conversations while giving them the tools to immediately respond and engage in those conversations.

Sysomos has been trusted by the world’s top agencies and brands for years to help them analyze and understand earned social media conversations and their audiences. With the addition of Expion we will not only be able to provide our customers with insights into their audiences and their motivations, but will also allow marketers to more effectively create and distribute owned content, place paid media, and guide customers through their journey of awareness, education, purchase and advocacy.

Sysomos and Expion will be integrating core technologies to provide a comprehensive family of products that help our customers solve the challenge of gathering, understanding, and engaging with the incredible amounts of social interactions taking place every day. We’ll continue to share with you exciting advancements in our platform throughout the coming months.

For more information about our announcement check out the official press release about the acquisition.

And if you’d like to learn a little more about Expion and what they do, check out this video below:

Expion – Social Software from Expion on Vimeo.

Once more, we’d like to welcome the Expion team into our growing Sysomos family, and thank our customers, friends and partners for their continued support.

The future is very exciting here at Sysomos, and we’re looking forward to having you as a part of it.

Shark Week 2015 Seemed To Be Better Received Than The Previous Year

Shark Week 2015In 2014, Shark Week put up impressive social media numbers, but it also received a lot of backlash. The backlash was due to the fact that their most publicized shows for the year were not true documentaries, but rather made up stories that were made to seem like they were real without telling their audience the truth. See our post on it here.

For Shark Week 2015, Discovery Channel promised that they would return to purely non-fictional programming and take the week of programming back to it’s roots. We decided to use Sysomos MAP to see how the social conversation went around Shark Week this year.

Looking for the terms “Shark Week,” “#SharkWeek,” “SharkWeek2015” and “#SharkWeek15” and found them mentioned 927,193 across blogs, forums, online news and Twitter over the 8 days of programming (July 5-12, 2015). Specifically, we found 1,211 blog posts, 2,691 online news articles, 2,287 forum postings and 921,004 tweets mentioning our search terms. This is down from 2014 where we found 1.6 million mentions across the same channels.

Sysomos MAP - Activity Summary of Shark Week 2015

With Twitter being the main channel where people seemed to be talking about Shark Week, we dug a little bit deeper. When we did this we found that most of the tweets, 76.2%, came from the United States, while Canadians accounted for 4.8% of all the tweets. We also found that both men and women were interested in tweeting along with Shark Week with women accounting for slightly more tweets than men, 55% vs 45%.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary for Shark Week 2015

We then took our search over to Tumblr and found 77,301 posts containing our search terms over the same period of time. This number is also down from 85,772 in 2014.

Sysomos MAP - Tumblr Activity Summary for Shark Week 2015

And on Facebook, we found Shark Week being talked about in 5,569 public status updates , which is significantly down from the over 17,000 we found last year.

Sysomos MAP - Facebook Activity Summary for Shark Week 2015

While many of the numbers we found for Shark Week 2015 were down from 2014, we did notice a similar pattern play out. When we took these mentions and looked at how they played out over the programming week we found that Shark Week started off strong towards the beginning of the week and then tapered off as it went on.

Sysomos MAP - Popularity Chart for Shark Week 2015

An even more interesting similarity to last year is that when we looked at the overall sentiment for Shark Week 2015, it was THE EXACT SAME as it was in 2014. Both years we saw 11% positive talk and 40% negative talk giving Shark Week an overall favourable rating of 60%. However, this year was a bit different.

 

Sysomos MAP - Overall Sentiment for Shark Week 2015

Last year when we saw a large amount of negative talk surrounding Shark Week it was due to people being upset around the programming. However, when we looked at a buzzgraph around this year’s Shark Week we found that the negative talk was actually stemming from shark talk. Words like “attack,” “bite” and “predator” were found throughout our text analytics this year, which technically have a negative connotation so would explain the large amount of negative sentiment. However, it also shows that people were very engaged with the shark related content that was coming out of Shark Week this year.

Sysomos MAP - Buzzgraph for Social Talk During Shark Week 2015

While numbers were down for Shark Week this year when we compared it to last year, by diving in deeper it actually turned out that people seemed to be more engaged with the actual shark content rather than complaining about being fooled.

Upcoming Webinar: What To Listen For When Your Brand Isn’t Being Talked About

Sysomos Webinar - What To Listen For  When No One Is Talking About Your Brand

If you have a new product or company, or more simply, you’re starting out on social media, how do you find out what’s being said about your market, company and products?

On July 23 from 1:30 – 2:30 PM Eastern, we’ll explore the topic of what to listen for when coming in to a new market or vertical.

We’ll discuss:

  • How to find your keywords surrounding your products/brand
  • What’s being said about your competitors. The good and the bad. :)
  • What’s being said about the business leaders in your field
  • How to find the most influential voices in your prospective communities
  • How to strike up conversations with those movers and shakers

And much more!

I’ll be leading the webinar and I look forward to the dialogue.

Jason Harris’ Bio

Jason Harris is Sr. Manager of Community and Evangelism at Sysomos. He manages Sysomos’ social strategy and Evangelism program. Jason works like mad to ensure data is relevant to decision makers and stakeholders. 

At Sysomos, Jason serves as a corporate liaison for the company’s clients, partners and customers as the head of community and brand evangelism.

Jason’s background is in corporate blogging, corporate community building and management and influencer marketing.

Join us by clicking here

Social Media Reporting Doesn’t Need To Be A Daunting Task

Being involved in social media marketing is a fun job. You get to come up with creative ways to engage your audience, speak to people from all corners of the world and help make your company look awesome to the rest of the world. But then it always comes to that one task that you dread… actually reporting on your social media activities.

Social media reporting doesn’t need a daunting task though. There are many tools that can help make the process a lot less painless, and Sysomos Heartbeat is one of those.

Set Up Specific Dashboards For Your Reports

One of the best features of our all new Sysomos Heartbeat is that we give you ability to truly customize your dashboards. With a customized dashboard you can have all of your important and need-to-know information at your fingertips anytime you need them all in one place. Another feature that makes customizable dashboards great is that as your plans and goals change for your social media activities, you can continuously change, rearrange and update your personal dashboard. You can even set up more than one dashboard to track different types of goals on their own.

If you want to customize your own dashboard, it’s really quite simple. Once you have your tags and filters* set in Sysomos Heartbeat to see the information you’re most interested in, find the widget that interests you. Let’s say for this example it’s the Activity Summary chart.

Now, notice in the upper right corner of the widget the widget settings icon? This is going to be important.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Activity Summary Widget

Selecting the widget settings icon will give you a drop down menu where you can select Add To Dashboard. Click that.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Widget Settings

Next, you’ll be given a drop down menu allowing you to select which already created dashboard you’d like to add that widget to. If you don’t already have a customized dashboard setup, you’ll be given the option to create a new one.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Select your Dashboard

Now, you can repeat this process until every piece of information you need to see is combined into your ultimate reporting dashboard. Any widget that you find inside the Monitor section of Sysomos Heartbeat can be added to a dashboard, which gives you endless possibilities for dashboards.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Executive Overview Sample Dashboard

 

Get Your Dashboards Sent Right To Your Inbox

Now that you have your perfect dashboard setup, it’s time to use it for easy reporting.

Additionally, the all-new Sysomos Heartbeat gives you the ability to subscribe to any and all of your dashboards. Subscribing to a dashboard will bring all the information that you just deemed as important to your reporting sent directly to your inbox… or even your boss’s inbox.

To subscribe to a dashboard simply head to the dashboard you want and in the upper right corner you should see a “Subscribe” button. Clicking that button will then give you a form where you can specify the email you want the dashboard sent to, what you’d like the subject of the email to say and how frequently you’d like it delivered, daily or weekly.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Subscribe To Your Dashboard
And that’s it!

You can now have your reports sent directly to you when you need them with no hassle whatsoever. It’s just that easy. Sysomos Heartbeat helps to make the daunting task of reporting on your social media activities as easy as opening an email.

If you’re already a Sysomos customer and want to learn about dashboards and how you set up your reports to be sent right to you, check out the dashboard information in our Support Portal*.

And if you’re not already using Sysomos to help take the hassle out of your reporting, what are you waiting for? Request to see a demo of Sysomos Heartbeat right now.

 

* This link goes to our client help section and you’ll need to login with your regular Sysomos login to access it.

Social Media Reporting: Where To Start

By now, being active in social media is pretty much table stakes for most modern companies and brands. But just being in social media isn’t enough. You have to learn from what you’re doing in social media so that you can continuously grow and get better. And the best way to learn is from reporting on what you’ve been doing and learning from what those reports tell you. Jason wrote a great post on why reporting on your social efforts is so important just last week.

While reporting is going to be crucial for your company so that you can get better, you first need to know what you’re going to report on so that you can learn from your efforts.

 

Start with knowing why you brand is active on social media

Getting involved in social media just to say that your company has a social media presence is not really a reason to be there. You should have clearly defined reasons for why you’re using social media.

For some companies, these reasons are going to be as simple as “create more awareness for our brand” or “to provide assistance for our customers on a channel that is easy for them.” Other reasons companies may get into social might include things like “to increase sales of our product/service” which can sometimes be a bit harder to measure, but not impossible.

By knowing your actual reason for getting involved in social will help you determine your goals and those will set you on the proper track to know what report on towards those goals.

Think about why your company is in social media in the first place

Create social media goals to compliment your reasons for being involved in social media

Once you know why you’re getting involved in social media it’s time to set some goals. Goals are going to help you set clear expectations for those reasons you’ve gotten into social media. More importantly, setting goals is going to help you to know if you’re achieving on your overall reasons for being in social media.

Goals for social media should be S.M.A.R.T. This is a simple acronym that means your goals should be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound. So, for example, you want to get into social media so you can increase the public awareness of your brand, you should have a corresponding goal that would be something like “gain 1000 new fans/followers over our first 3 months.”

In this case, you have a specific reason for why you’re entering social media in the first place, and you have a target goal that you can work towards to justify your reason.

S.M.A.R.T. Goals

Here’s a few other examples of some S.M.A.R.T. goals you might want to consider:

  • If your reason for being in social media is to provide customer service via social media, your goal can be “to respond to all customer service requests within 30 minutes of when they come in” or “to help our customers by closing a minimum of 10 customer support tickets every week day” or even “to make sure that every customer walks away from a service request with a positive experience.”
  • If your reason for being on Twitter is to drive people to your company’s blog, your goal could be something like “to increase the number of blog visitors (click-throughs) we get daily by 30% over two months” or “increase the average number of page views per visit to a minimum of 3 pages in the next 6 months.”
  • If you decided that your reason for being in social is prove yourself or your company as a thought leader in your respective space, your goal might be “to have our CEO make one post to LinkedIn Publishing per month and have 1000 people read that piece.”

In all of these examples above, the goal always relates back to the reason for being in social media and has clearly defined and attainable measurements that have specific timelines. This is how you should think about all the goals that you start setting.

It’s also important to remember when setting goals that no two social networks are identical. Every network will have it’s own uses, so you may want to set up different goals for each channel, but making sure that they are still relevant to your overall reasons for being there in the first place.

 

Measure and report on your efforts towards those goals

Now that we know why you want to be in social media in the first place and we’ve set up some goals that will help us to justify those reasons, it’s time to start thinking about how you’re going to measure and report on those goals.

In the world of digital marketing, pretty much everything is trackable. The real difficult part comes down to deciding on how much of those things you’re actually going to report on. While it’s easy to get caught up in all of the numbers you might be able to see, if you took the first two steps above you should have a clearer idea of where to head when it’s time to report on your social efforts.

While your reports might include what some people refer to as “vanity metrics,” things like how your fans/followers increased, how many likes/favorites or shares/RT’s your content got, you should focus more on measurements that relate to your defined goals.

These will be known as your KPIs, which stands for Key Performance Indicators.

Report on things that show you're working towards your KPI's

If you follow these steps, you should now have a great idea of what you’re going to report on when your boss or client asks “How are things going with our social media efforts?”

Build social intelligence in your content production process and reporting frameworks. Reach out to us and we’d be happy to show you how Sysomos can help you measure towards your social media KPI’s and make sure you’re measuring the right things.

5 Advanced Sysomos Tips and Tricks You May Be Missing Out On

Every day, we get to see our amazing clients use Sysomos in amazing ways. But no matter how smart our clients are (and they’re pretty smart), not everyone can possibly know everything. Especially with software like ours that’s always full of fun surprises for our clients.

While you can’t know everything, we thought it would be great to help our clients get a bit better at their jobs. So we decided to ask our team of Social Media Specialists “what amazing thing in Sysomos do you think too many clients are missing out on?”

Here’s 5 of our favorite answers:

 

Anastasia Kedrova, Enterprise Social Media Specialist – Bookmarks in Sysomos Heartbeat

Bookmarks in Heartbeat can be customized to be accessible to only 1 user or a group of users, as opposed to all users. This is an excellent time saving tool and a way for team members to make sure they are looking at the exact same filter set when collaborating in Heartbeat. Also, don’t forget to give your bookmarks names that are easy for everyone that sees them to understand what they’re looking at.

Create Bookmarks In Sysomos Heartbeat

 

Alex DiRenzo, Agency Social Media Specialist – Learn More About The People Talking About Your Brand

A lot of clients use the Followers Bio Word Cloud to learn more about their Twitter followers, but what about all the people that mention their brand that aren’t following? This is where CSV export files can be utilized – Write a simple brand mentions query. Export the Twitter results. In the CSV file there will be a bio column. Copy the whole column into word or another excel sheet and de-duplicate the list so that no users bio is repeating itself. Paste the duplicate free results into any available online word cloud generator. Voila – you have a word cloud of all the ways those who mentioned your brand are self identifying in their Twitter bio. The largest words will be the most commonly occurring. Note you may want to remove any words from the word cloud that you may consider fluff – i.e. love, Twitter, I, work, live, etc. Look no further than your own twitter bio to see how many personal details you’ve revealed in a short space to see how this can be valuable.

 

David FollertManager, Client Experience Removing the “Common Filter” in MAP’s Compare Tab

Lots of people use the compare tab in MAP to compare themselves to their competitors over a common timeline and filter set. But removing the common filter gives you the ability to compare so much more. You could compare the same query or hashtag filtered by different geographies, demographics or timelines. It’s really useful.

Sysomos MAP - Give each query in Compare it's own Filter Set

 

Lianna MacDonald, Enterprise Social Media Specialist Search In Your Own Heartbeat

One thing I think more clients can take advantage of is the fact that they can create Boolean queries in their own Heartbeat allowing them to do an ad-hoc search amongst all the mentions in their Heartbeat account (up to 30K mentions).

Margot Underdown, Social Media Specialist – Community Media Sets in MAP & Heartbeat

See how a specific twitter community found in our Communities tool is talking about a certain topic/brand/product and who this community is by adding them to a Media Set. Drill down their conversations by jumping into Text Analytics, Demographics and Top Influencers.

Want even more insight? Try running a blank query search and go through the analytics again to find out if this community has any other commonalities outside of your original search topic. This can help your brand provide more valuable and relatable content to a specific audience.

Sysomos Heartbeat - Creating A Media Set Based On A Community Of Influence

 

If you need any help implementing or want to learn more about any of the tips above, feel free to reach out to your dedicated Sysomos Social Media Specialist.

If you ever want to learn more cool Sysomos tips and tricks, make sure you check our great Sysomos Support Portal.

And if you’re not already a Sysomos client, but are interested in learning how you can become one and do some of the cool things mentioned above, feel free to reach out and request a demo of our software.

Everyone Is An Expert. Use Them For Content.

Creating content isn’t an easy job. Believe me, I know because it’s a big part of my role here at Sysomos. Luckily, I don’t have to do it all by myself because I’m surrounded by a ton of smart people both inside and outside our company and make sure I use their smarts whenever possible.

I’m not alone in this content creation situation. Everyone knows just how important it is to have great content, especially in the online world, these days. But don’t worry, no matter what size your company is, you’re not alone either.

Here are a few ways that you can enlist others’ help in creating content for your brand:

Ask the amazing people you work with

I’m lucky to work with a ton of really smart and creative people. From our product group that help to make Sysomos software great or our account team who help to make sure our clients have the best experience possible with us. They’re all very smart and all have their own areas of expertise in their fields that can benefit our clients and customers. That’s why I it make a consistent practice to call upon their help in content creation.

Whether you send out a company wide email or you make a posting looking for some assistance on your company intranet, there’s a good chance people in your company will be more than willing to help. People like to help, especially if they get some sort of recognition for it or will benefit from it. The problem is most people in marketing or communications don’t go outside of their departments for help, but you’d be surprised what you’ll find when you do.

help-me-help-you

 

Find customers/superfans and ask them to contribute

You know who else loves to help when they can? Your customers and superfans.

These are going to be the people who use and love your product. They’re probably doing amazing things with it and have perspectives that are different than yours. Even just talking to some of these people will give you new and great ideas for content or, at least, how you can shape some of your future content.

Sometimes, your customers or superfans may even want to get in on the content creation process. This could be in the form of a case study (highlighting how they are using your product/service) to a testimonial (singing your praise) to something else that’s completely different. Don’t be afraid to get creative and try new ideas from others, you might get amazing results from it.

For example, we love when clients do cool and interesting things with our Sysomos software. It gives us a chance to highlight interesting ways people are using our software, plus they help us to create the content to highlight it. One of my favorite examples in the time I’ve been here was a few Christmases ago when Canadian Tire and their agency used Sysomos to light up a Christmas Tree based on holiday cheer being spread through social media. This was a great way for them to get extra exposure for their project, it gave us something cool to write about and it was something interesting that we wouldn’t have thought to do on our own.

Canadian Tire's Christmas Tree - Powered by Sysomos

Knowing who your customers are to hit up for some help in creating content is easy (and if you don’t know, again, ask around your company and people will know). But what about finding your superfans? If you don’t already know who they are, you can use a social intelligence tool, like Sysomos, to search them out. You can do a search for your brand or product name in a tool like Sysomos MAP and then look up who are the people that mention it the most. Like this example below, we did a quick search and were able to determine the people that mention they love their Fitbits a lot on Twitter which means they are likely superfans who may want to help the brand if they contacted them.

Sysomos MAP - People who mention they  "love fitbit"

Can’t write? No problem. There’s other ways these people can help.

Once you’ve determined some people to enlist in your quest for creating more content, you’re bound to hear the common response, “I’m not a good writer” at least a few times. But don’t let that discourage you. Writing is only part of the content creation process. There’s a lot of ways these “non-writers” can still help.

scott-pilgrim-its-hard

A lot of people think that they can’t write, but they’d be surprised what happens when they actually try. Give them a little bit of encouragement to try and, as a writer yourself, offer to help them fix it up once they’ve put together a first draft.

If they’re really against writing, don’t worry, there’s a ton of other ways you could work with these people to get them to help you produce content. Here’s just a few examples:

  • Make a video of them talking about a topic (a lot of people find it easier to talk about something than to write about it)
  • Do a Q&A session (either written, transcribed or on video)
  • Ask your customers what their biggest questions are and create content that answers those questions
  • Get someone to tell you about a process and then transcribe that process into an easy to follow infographic
  • Do a picture heavy editorial and ask people to submit their own photos around an event or topic
  • Ask them to tell you a story and then transcribe it or record it and turn it into a visually appealing video
  • Get them to create a bulleted list (this helps them get away from thinking they need to write out proper paragraphs of points)
  • Make an audio recording that an be easily shared

That list could go on and on, but we think you get the point of how many different ways there are for these “non-writers” to still help you create great content.

Now stop worrying about all that content you thought you had to create on your own and go out there and enlist some help. Everyone’s an expert on something. Use their expertise.

Announcing Our Newest Executive Hires!

It’s such an exciting time to be at Sysomos. After announcing our independence in February, we’ve fast-tracked innovation like no other time in our history.

Today we’re happy to announce our most recent executive level hires that will help us across our organization to deliver innovative, data-science solutions for our current and future client base.

Our latest executive hires were hand-picked by CEO Lindsay Sparks and we couldn’t be more excited to welcome them into the organization!


Omer Aziz, Senior Vice President of Human Resources

Omer AzizOmer brings more than 25 years of experience working in global telecommunication and high tech companies. Aziz has a combined background in engineering and HR, both in education and experience. Aziz recently completed an assignment in the UK as the International Head of HR for BlackBerry. Before that he held various senior roles in HR and Operations at BlackBerry, Nortel and Bell Canada.

 



Edward Byon, Chief Financial Officer

Edward ByonWith over 15 years of financial, accounting and management experience, Edward previously worked as a consultant for large organizations including Tyco Integrated Securities and Siemens. Byon also held senior finance positions for Ruggedcom Inc. and Sun Microsystems, and was instrumental to the acquisition and integration work by Siemens and Oracle, respectively.

 

 


 

Eric Kafka, Vice President, Corporate Development

Eric KafkaEric joins Sysomos from OMERS Private Equity, where he spent a significant amount of his time in the software space and worked on numerous transactions, including both acquisitions and divestitures. Eric started his career with Scotiabank Global Banking and Markets in the Mergers and Acquisitions Group, where he worked on a number of M&A transactions across a diversified group of industries.

 

 



Timothy Torres, Senior Vice President of Infrastructure

Tim TorressTim brings nearly three decades of experience in information technology to the Sysomos team, most recently from NICE Systems, where he was vice president of global hosting operations. He has a deep understanding of the intricacies involved in building the infrastructure required to support the vast amounts of data pulsing through the Sysomos platform.

 

 


 

Mark Young, Chief Marketing Officer

Mark YoungMark comes to Sysomos from Clear Channel, where he served as the executive vice president of marketing solutions, and before that he spent fifteen years at Microsoft as general manager. Throughout his more than twenty year career, Young has overseen product development, program management, business modeling, marketing, brand building, and finance for consumer products and services, as well as for business-to-business products and services, and partner management.