Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

Finding The True Impact Of A Tweet Using Tweet Life

Last week Derek Thompson, a writer for The Atlantic, wrote an article in which he questioned the real value of a tweet. In his article The Unbearable Lightness Of Tweeting, Thompson expressed disappointment because a tweet he was sure was going to get a lot of attention, both on Twitter and with click throughs to the actual article, didn’t draw the engagement he anticipated.

As a journalist Thompson wanted to spread the word about his story and generate traffic to The Atlantic’s website. However, a little less than a week later, in his own words, here’s what he found:

“By Friday morning, it had about 155,260 impressions. According to the new Tweet activity dashboard, 2.9 percent of those users clicked the image, and 1.1 percent retweeted or favored it… but just 1 percent clicked on the link to actually read my story. One percent.”

At first glance, Mr. Thompson is right – a 1% engagement rate is rather low. But, 1,553 clicks isn’t that bad, but it might seem that way when there was the chance for over 155,000 clicks. But does it really mean that there’s no real value to a tweet?

It turns out – you just need to look at the bigger picture. You see, Thompson was using Twitter’s analytics tool and while it’s fantastic at showing a reporting snapshot, a reporting suite such as Sysomos MAP tells a more complete story.

We weren’t the only people that contemplated this question. Our friends over at SKDKnickerbocker thought that there is also a lot more value to a tweet and decided to investigate further into Thompson’s tweet. In the blog post where they did this, they start by pointing out that, “Twitter is a social media platform and the most valuable takeaway, in our view, is the way the message is shared beyond Derek’s 27.8k followers.”

SKDKnickerbocker pulled up Thompson’s tweet to explore its real value using Sysomos MAP‘s Tweet Life function. Tweet Life was able to show that this particular tweet actually seemed to perform quite well. They used Tweet Life to follow the chain of the tweet, meaning how many followers of followers retweeted Thompson’s tweet. In this case the chain went to a level of 10. Looking at this graphic to illustrate the chain, the tweet actually traveled quite far from Thompson’s initial following.

Tweet Life Chain - Created by SKDKnickerbocker

In a report that we did back in 2010 we looked at 1.2 billion tweets and found that the average tweet gets the majority of it’s retweets within the first hour before dying off. Tweet Life can also show you the full life of a tweet. Many studies have shown that tweets barely live on past 10 minutes. In the case of Thompson’s tweet, its half-life was at 10 hours and 13 minutes. That means that his tweet was still going strong over 10 hours later and wasn’t finished yet. The 80% life of this tweet came 2 days and 6 hours after it was tweeted out. This, my friends, is a tweet with legs and a half-life that extended well beyond most twitter activity.

Tweet Life Half-Life - Created by SKDKnickerbocker

There’s many reasons that could explain why Thompson’s tweet didn’t get as many click-throughs to The Atlantic as he had hoped. Perhaps people didn’t find the topic as interesting as he did. It could also be, as Bianca Prade from SKDKnickerbocker told us on the phone, that “sometimes people go to a social network to get their news on the platform that they’re on,” meaning that they could have got enough interesting information for themselves from Thompson’s tweet alone.

Twitter’s analytics dashboard can give you some interesting information about your tweets. But it also only shows you part of the story. This is why many brands and agencies turn to using Sysomos. With tools such as Tweet Life and many others in our software you can get a more complete picture of how well your Twitter and other social media efforts are performing.

If you want a more complete story of how your social is performing, contact us. We’d be more than happy to help you see the full picture.

What Drove Twitter During The Oscars; A Sysomos Report

The Oscars 2015Last week we made a prediction on which film we thought was going to win the Best Picture category at The Oscars over the weekend. We were wrong.

However, if we looked only at Twitter data, we probably would have been right, because Birdman had run away with the conversation on Twitter.

As they say, hindsight is always 20/20. So with clear eyes we’ve created a Sysomos Report looking back at how the evening at The Oscars played out on Twitter.

The first interesting thing that we found was that this year’s Oscars only 8.48 million mentions across social media, which was 39% less than the 2014 Oscars. 99.5% of all of those mentions came from Twitter, which is why we examined Twitter heavily for this report.

Aside from just analyzing the overall theme of The Oscars, we’ve dug deeper into three categories that stood out to our team during the awards. The first is how people were talking about the host. This year’s show was hosted by Neil Patrick Harris and while a lot of people liked him, people seemed to have liked Ellen DeGeneres, who hosted last year, even more. When we compared the two years together we found that NPH was only mentioned in one Oscars related tweet to every 10 that Ellen was mentioned in the previous year. We also looked into who people were tweeting that they’d like to see host next year.

Second, we looked at which of the acceptance speeches was tweeted about the most. Here we found that Patricia Arquette’s acceptance speech for her Best Supporting Actress win in which she spoke about equality for women. This stirred up a lot of talk from the Twitter world, some good and some bad, but was by far the most tweeted about speech.

Lastly, we looked at the #AskHerMore hashtag, which was being used to imply that women have a lot more to talk about than just who they’re wearing as they walk down the red carpet and that reporters covering it should care more. While this hashtag was actually started in 2014, our report finds that 59% of the total times the hashtag has been tweeted was done on Sunday night.

Take a look at the full Sysomos report below:

Sysomos Reports: A Twitter Breakdown of The 2015 Grammys

The GrammysSunday night was one of the biggest nights for music of the year, the 57th Annual Grammy Awards.

The Grammys are always a big event as people tune in to watch their favourite artists perform, see if their favourite artists win awards for their music and, of course, to see what all the celebrities are wearing as they walk down the red carpet.

As like every award show these days, people also love to tweet along as they watch everything play out live on TV. This year, tweets around the Grammys surpassed 10.8 million. That’s a 28% increase in tweets compared to the 2014 Grammys.

Our Sysomos Reports team saw all this action and took a deeper dive into those more than 10.8 million tweets to see what all the action was about. We found that tweets seemed to fall mostly into three categories, which our team then explored in depth; overall Grammy tweets, tweets about nominated artists and tweets about who was the best and worst dressed at the awards. We then put together a report to share our findings around each of these categories to share with you.

In the Sysomos Report below you’ll find information like:

  • Re-tweets accounted for 64% of Twitter content, while 33% were regular tweets and 3% were replies
  • Online activity peaked at 11 PM, when Sam Smith won the Record of the Year award
  • The live performances during the award show generated over 326K mentions and were the most popular theme of the night as well as the key driver of positive conversations (33% of the overall positive content)
  • Winners of the award categories we examined were generally the most tweeted about predictions, except for the album of the year category (which apparently Kanye West didn’t agree with either)
  • People thought that Taylor Swift was the best dressed of the evening while they also thought that Madonna was the worst dressed

Take a look at the full Sysomos Report below:

A Social Media Wrap-Up of Super Bowl XLIX

Super Bowl XLIXThe big game has ended and the world knows that the New England Patriots are now the official Super Bowl XLIX champions (which we actually predicted this would happen last week).

Millions of people around the globe tuned in on Sunday night to watch the very exciting game (and some did for the commercials and the half-time show). But not only were people tuning in on their TV’s, they were also tuning in though social media to see what others were saying about the event and chime in themselves. The Super Bowl has become one of the largest events that people collectively talk through social media about (especially in North America).

Our fantastic Sysomos Reports team was also tuned into the Super Bowl action on social media and recorded everything that they were seeing. The result is a great report on the social media activity that you can view below.

For this report, our team focused on the events of the game and the half-time show, but left out the commercials (which have already been wrapped up many times over across the web).

Some of the highlights you can find in our report include:

  • Super Bowl XLIX, the halftime show and the two competing teams generated a total of 16.7 million tweets on February 1
  • This is about 8% lower compared to the number of tweets accumulated during the Super Bowl XLVIII on February 2, 2014
  • 56% of all tweets this year were retweeted posts, while 41% were original user tweets
  • The social battle between the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks ended with a close win for the Patriots by 14,000 tweets; The quarterbacks’ share of voice was split in 82% for Tom Brady and 18% for Russell Wilson
  • Focusing on two of the more notable issues this year, the brawl that occurred during the last moments of the game (43,574 tweets) was a more dominant topic compared to mentions about the #deflategate issue (32,545 tweets)
  • Sentiment of tweets about the Super Bowl this year was generally favorable, with 58% of all posts (excluding neutral content) being positive
  • Mentions about the Halftime Show were close to 3 million tweets; Katy Perry appeared in 39% of all halftime mentions, compared to 2% for Lenny Kravitz and 8% for Missy Elliott
  • In comparison, Bruno Mars and his SBXLVIII Halftime Show surfaced in 580,700 tweets on February 2, 2014
  • Viewers’ sentiment about the Halftime Show was quite favorable, with 55% of conversations being positive

Take a look at the full report below and let us know what you think stands out the most to you in the comments:

A Season Of Social To Predict A Super Bowl Champion

Super Bowl XLIXThis weekend is Super Bowl XLIX. The New England Patriots are squaring off against the Seattle Seahawks to find out which NFL team reigns supreme this year.

As we do with other sports, we thought it would be fun to take a look at the social media buzz around each of the teams using MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, over the course of their season. Usually we would look at the buzz around the teams from the start of the season up until today. However, due a little controversy surrounding one of the playoff games from this season (you may have heard of something called “deflategate” going around) we thought that one team would for sure get an unfair advantage in terms of mention volume, while the other team would get one because of the negativity around their opponent. So, for the analysis below we only looked at the regular NFL season which ran between September 4 to December 28, 2014.

We searched for both teams names, nicknames and Twitter handles over the course of the season and found a staggering difference in the amount of social conversations around each team. In terms of overall mentions, the Patriots were in 7,177,831 social conversations over the season. The Seahawks, however, were only part of 4,285,927 social conversations.

Sysomos MAP - Compare Overall Mentions

Even when we broke it down to look at the mentions over individual channels, the Patriots always came out on top. The Seahawks got beat out in mentions across blogs, online news, forums and tweets.

Sysomos MAP - Compare By Source

It becomes more evident when we look at the mentions of both teams plotted out over time. A look at our popularity chart gives a good visualization of just how much more the Patriots were talked about than the Seahawks. Especially on game days, which are all the spikes in conversation you see below.

Sysomos MAP - Comparison Popularity Chart

When we pulled up the sentiment around the two Super Bowl combatants we once again found that the Seahawks had come up short compared to the Patriots. The talk around the Seahawks was only 27% positive while also being 30% negative. In the meantime, the talk around the Patriots was 47% positive and only 19% negative.

Sysomos MAP - Sentiment Comparison

If social media talk could predict a Super Bowl winner, it’s probably safe to say that New England Patriots are guaranteed a win on Sunday. However, fan popularity doesn’t win games, so we’ll just have to wait and see what happens. Who do you think’s going to win?

Just for fun, we also wanted to compare the two teams on Twitter to see how the stats swayed so far in  the Patriots favour since Twitter saw the most action. When we compared the fan bases of the two teams we found something interesting about the loyalty of football fans. The Seahawks have 797,000 followers while the Patriots have 1.1 million and out of all those fans, only 9.7 of them overlap. When people have a team, they only care about what’s going on with that team.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Follower Comparison

While that’s not a huge revolution, it does also help to explain this next piece of data we found that probably explains how the Patriots got so far ahead.

When we compared where people were tweeting about the Patriots and the Seahawks from, we found that New England has a very spread out fan base, while Seattle’s is more local. Looking at the states where mentions of the teams were coming from, you can see that Seahawk tweets were coming the most from Washington State, which makes sense. But when you look at where mentions of the Patriots were coming from, Massachusetts only makes up some of the tweets, while their “other” bar on the chart is through the roof, meaning that Patriots have fans spread out much more across the US than the Seahawks did.

Sysomos MAP - US States Tweets Comparison

So, in case you missed it above, the Patriots are obviously a more popular team. But again, popularity doesn’t necessarily win Super Bowls…

The #NBABallot Campaign Is Seeing Great Numbers From Engaged Fans

#NBABallotIt wasn’t too long ago when to vote your favourite player into an All-Star Game for any sport you had to go to a game and try to poke out those little holes in a ballot card. But gone are those days.

As social media becomes more prevalent throughout almost everything we do, sport leagues have taken it as an opportunity to keep all of their fans involved, regardless of if they physically attend a game or not.

The NBA is currently doing this by inviting fans to vote for their favourite players to appear in the All-Star Game this year via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

The NBA is asking fans to post on one of these social networks with the hashtag “#NBABallot” along with the player they want to vote in. The NBA is then monitoring these channels and adding the results to their website voting and text message votes. They’re also allowing you to vote once a day, so some

And basketball fans around the world seem to be loving it.

As of right now, there’s still six days left for people to cast their votes. However, the NBA is already seeing a great response to this campaign. We used MAP, our social media monitoring and analytics software, to see just how well this campaign has been doing so far.

Starting from December 10th up until yesterday (voting started on the 11th), we found the #NBABallot hashtag used across 1.8 million tweets.  That means that people have been voting for their favourite players at an average speed of 2,210 an hour over the past 33 days. Those are some pretty engaged fans.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Activity Summary

What’s more is that it’s not only engaging people in the United States. The United States only accounts for 57.3% of all the votes cast so far. Votes are coming in from around the world. A look at our heat map of where tweets are originating from shows that people around the world are interested in the NBA and are casting their votes.

Sysomos MAP - Geo Location Heat Map of Tweets

Over on Instagram the hype is quite large as well. A search for the #NBABallot hashtag on Instagram shows us that it’s been used their 207,670 times.

Sysomos MAP - Instagram Activity Summary

In a great move by the NBA and all of the teams around the league, we can see some examples above of pictures to help go with fans votes to make it as easy as possible to cast a vote on the network. All a fan needs to do if they don’t have a picture of their favourite player is download a pre-made picture, which are designed to grab attention and encourage more people to vote and use the hashtag, and upload it to their own account.

Unfortunately, due to Facebook’s privacy settings we couldn’t get a great amount of data behind how many people are posting the #NBABallot hashtag, but if Twitter and Instagram are any indication, we think it’s safe to assume that they’re seeing large numbers as well. You may even have some basketball friend’s of your own who are making posts like these:

Facebook Voting for #NBABallot 1

 

Adding the social voting component to the All-Star Game voting process a few years ago was a great move by the NBA. They realized that their fan base extended past the people that could come into the arena and punch the little holes. It even extended past the United States. By giving fans around the world a chance to participate in this event and making it easy as possible for them, the NBA is solidifying their global audience.

And for those of you wondering which players are being voted for the most, only the NBA knows for sure as they are the only ones with access to all of the numbers. However, according to their last count on January 8, Lebron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers and Steph Curry of the Golden State Warriors are leading the league in total votes respectively in first and second place. We thought it would be interesting to see how they faired against each other on Twitter. So we searched for mentions of their names along side the #NBABallot hashtag and found that Twitter mimics the NBA’s count with James leading the way 105,727 tweets, but Curry isn’t far behind with 89,132 tweets of his own.

Sysomos MAP - Twitter Comparison

 

Best of 2014: New Twitter Rules After the Death of Robin Williams

Social media has given everyone a voice. It allows people to say what they want whenever they want. However, this freedom has of course led to some people saying things that can be deemed as offensive.

This year, in the wake of a celebrity death that the whole world was paying attention to, Twitter invoked some new rules to their network that would allow people to have hateful and inappropriate material removed from the network.

It was an unfortunate incident that brought about this new rule, as you’ll read below, but many people are thankful for it.

While social media still remains a place for freedom of speech in most cases, this new rule was a welcome change for people who are being attacked through social media.

This post was first published on September 5, 2014:

 

article-2723742-207FF52400000578-54_634x422In the wake of Robin William’s shocking suicide last month, social media exploded with memories, kind words and warm wishes for his friends and family. Unfortunately, some of the tweets directed at his children were less than kind and thoughtful.

In light of his daughter, Zelda, being the victim of the harsh and cruel attention by certain users, Twitter has changed its rules as to what it deems to be inappropriate .

The new rule allows the family of the deceased to have hateful or inappropriate material removed. The Williams family worked with Twitter to create this rule and, unfortunatel,y it is a necessary one.

How big of a topic was Williams’ death on Twitter? There were about 63,000 tweets a minute on August 11, showing the range and power of Twitter and how many users were deeply affected by his death.

The posts that led to the rule change involved users sending Zelda Williams Photoshopped images of her father’s corpse and his cause of death.

Twitter is a newsfeed first and foremost but it also doubles as a place to share, reflect and learn. Williams’ death illustrates both  aspects, but it was wise of Twitter to create new rules to protect the loved ones left to read all of the messages.

All users and organizations know you are at the mercy of whatever is posted. There’s not much you can do when reading about a trending topic. You can ignore, retort or hope that others will come to your aide and defend.

The reality is that Twitter and all social media is a free medium where opinion flows every second in real-time. You have to be willing to absolve everything shot your way, but in this case it was too sadistic and personal.

Twitter is best served as a great and powerful newsfeed and arena for discussion. These negative moments are going to happen but Twitter should be applauded by not hiding behind that fact.

 

Best of 2014: Will The Buy Button Reshape Online Shopping?

One big question that always seems to arise in business meetings around social media is “How has this helped our sales?”

Sometimes this can be a very easy question to answer, but a lot of the time it’s a lot more complicated. Social media has the ability to help people make purchasing decsions, but sometimes it’s hard to see the clear line someone followed from social media to actually buying a product in a brick and mortar store, or even an e-commerce site.

But what if you could press a “buy” button right from a tweet or a Facebook post?

The opportunity to do so really intrigues a lot of businesses, and that’s why a lot of people got excited about the possibility of these buttons becoming a reality.

Today’s “Best of 2014″ post is a favourite of some of our staff because they love this idea of being able to purchase something right from their favourite social network and think that a lot of our Sysomos clients are very interested in the idea as well.

This post was first published on October 1, 2014:

 

twitter_buy_buttonOne of the world’s most active and popular social networks is trying to venture into digital regions that most other networks have been slow to set foot within.

News emerged recently that Twitter was testing a button which would appear on tweets and allow a user to instantly buy something. The button would be embedded and ideally relevant to the post.

Some reports claimed that a non-operational Buy button appeared for some users earlier this year.

The testing involves a small amount of U.S. users who will see and have access to the Buy Button and its functionality. The number will grow as time goes on.

This is a huge development not just for Twitter but for all of social media. The immediacy of learning about products and services both from brands and their fans, then being able to buy is a radical shift.

This is certainly one way to bolster the economy along with the bottom line of many online retailers. The biggest winner in all of this will be Twitter, which would naturally grow from influencing buying decisions to being a shopping mecca.

If successfully deployed, it has the potential to shift Twitter from a social network to a leader in e-commerce. It has the potential to even be the leader in both.

The initial rollout of the button didn’t require the button to be part of an advertisement or appear as a sponsored tweet. Businesses won’t have to pay for the service of the button which means even more businesses will look to Twitter as the place they need to invest their time.

The ease of purchasing will drive users to see Twitter as the ultimate newsfeed and shopping mall meaning the potential is through the roof on many fronts.

The Buy Button should drive advertising dollars, user engagement and most likely a slew of imitators.

 

Argos Gloriously Chirp Ticats

07b33e51-4edf-49a0-ae26-ad5675dfc6af_300Social media is a digital battleground for enemies to meet and exchange barbs. It’s all in good fun and can even make brands and organizations more appealing to users.

Even a generally polite Canadian brand was getting into the fun, when a moment to stick it to an old foe presented itself.

Nothing says good clean fun like the big game which brings out all sorts of characters from opposing teams (even though  those not participating). this was evident in the CFL Grey Cup from last weekend where The Calgary Stampeders defeated the Hamilton Tiger Cats.

Once the final score was in, the Tiger-Cats arch-nemesis The Toronto Argonauts wasted no time in taking to Twitter to let them know that they had once again lost the big game.

The tweet was brilliant. It was an image of a ribbon that read “Back to Back Grey Cup Participants”. How much do you love the Argos right about now? Of course, it is not lost on many that the Argos did not make the playoffs. In fact, this became a sticking point.

This started a fun back and forth and fans were happy to join in and take a side. Canadian sports journalists are even taking sides and it seemed to generally favor the Tiger-Cats as opposed to the trash talking Argos.

Fans of each CFL team should continue to keep the fun going, and hopefully help keep it strong through the offseason creating buzz for the 2015 season.

This is one of the best benefits of social media. It can be used to bring enemies together and allow them to assist the other to market and communicate while getting fans excited. For a brand like the CFL utilizing Twitter is a great way to build your brand in a different but positive light.

Please remember to keep it light and fun, and even consider creating the strategy with your competition. When you think about it…why wouldn’t you?

Twitter’s Teen Journalists Breaking News

IcVIMZnTwitter is a funny thing when you actually stop and think about it. It’s a content aggregator where news stories of all sizes are broken, discussed and debated.

Twitter (and all social media) delivers breaking news stories and, in the process, become an opinion leader in an open and level playing field.

No one proves this reality more than Jake Wesley, a high school freshman from Missouri. This young baseball fan has become one of the most respected baseball voices for his ability to break stories on Twitter.

Wesley was the first to disclose the Boston Red Sox’s dual signing of Pablo Sandoval and Hanley Ramirez. He has verified anonymous sources, and his tweets are respected by longtime baseball writers like Jon Heyman of CBS Sports.

You have to give full marks to Wesley because he has achieved success in a field dominated by more seasoned professionals.

You also can’t disclose Twitter’s role in Wesley’s success, or the success of any non-established journalist able to build a name and brand for themselves.

Days before Wesley broke the signing of two of the biggest free agents in baseball, another young teen, Devon Fink, broke the story of Billy Butler signing with the Oakland Athletics. Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports confirmed the story for Fink.

Pretty amazing, isn’t it?

These teens are earning kudos by putting in the work, stay active on Twitter, and using a platform that gives them a global platform.

When you think about it, Twitter has broken down the barriers of entry to activities such as journalism. It has allowed for the rise of the independents who want nothing more than to report the news and break stories.